Diseases & Conditions

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Types of Coronary Artery Disease

Acute Coronary Syndromes

Three types of heart attack occur because of sudden rupture of plaque inside the coronary artery. These depend on the location of blockage, amount of time blood flow is blocked, and damage that occurs. Emergency medical care is critical for these life-threatening conditions.

Advanced Ischemic Heart Disease

Patients with aggressive heart conditions are at risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. They may have already had at least one coronary artery bypass surgery, multiple stents or angioplasty procedures, or still suffer from chest pain even after receiving optimum treatment.

Bifurcation Blockage

Fatty build-up is more likely to occur in the Y-junction where vessels branch off from the main coronary artery because of changes in blood flow. Narrowing in this region is called bifurcation blockage, and it is treated using special techniques to prop up the vessel.

Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction)

“Myo” means muscle and cardial refers to the heart. Infarction means death of tissue due to lack of blood supply. Heart attack is myocardial infarction, and it causes permanent damage to the heart muscle.

Microvessel Disease

This type of cardiovascular disease occurs when tiny blood vessels narrow when they should widen. This starves the heart muscle of oxygen and causes chest pain that can impact quality of life. This disease affects women and can be treated by medications to ease pain and lifestyle changes.

Stent Restenosis

When an artery or large blood vessel is treated with a stent to prop open the vessel and allow for healthy blood flow, it can collapse and require medical attention again. An experienced cardiac suggest interventional procedures that will remedy the situation.

Total Coronary Occlusion

A complete blockage in a coronary artery can lead to heart attack because of restricted blood flow to the heart muscle. When the blockage is more than three months old, it is called a chronic coronary occlusion.


Reviewed: 04/10


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This information is provided by Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

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