What is an MRI for heart disease?

A test that produces high-quality still and moving pictures of the heart and great vessels. MRI uses large magnets and radio-frequency waves to produce pictures of the body’s internal structures; no x-ray exposure is involved. MRI acquires information about the heart as it is beating; creating moving images of the heart throughout its pumping cycle.

Your doctor uses the MRI to evaluate:

  • The anatomy and function of the structures of the chest: heart, great vessels and pericardium
  • Presence of disease: ischemic heart disease, thoracic aortic disease, pericardial disease, right ventricular abnormalities, cardiac tumors, valve disease, heart muscle disease (cardiomyopathy), pulmonary artery disease and complex congenital heart disease

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