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Syncope

What is syncope?

Syncope (pronounced “sin ko pea”) is the medical term for fainting or passing out. It is caused by a temporary drop in the amount of blood that flows to the brain.

Syncope can happen if you have a sudden drop in blood pressure, a drop in heart rate, or changes in the amount of blood in areas of your body. If you pass out, you will likely become conscious and alert right away, but you may be feel confused for a bit.

Autonomic Nervous System (ANS)
Autonomic Nervous System (ANS)

The ANS automatically controls many functions of the body, such as breathing, blood pressure, heart rate and bladder control. Most times, these things happen without us noticing.

How common is syncope?

Syncope is a common condition. It affects 3% of men and 3.5% of women at some point in life. Syncope is more common as you get older and affects up to 6% of people over age 75. The condition can occur at any age and happens in people with and without other medical problems.

What are the symptoms of syncope?

The most common symptoms of syncope include:

  • Blacking out
  • Feeling lightheaded
  • Falling for no reason
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Feeling drowsy or groggy
  • Fainting, especially after eating or exercising
  • Feeling unsteady or weak when standing
  • Changes in vision, such as seeing spots or having tunnel vision
  • Headaches

Many times, patients feel an episode of syncope coming on. They have what are called “premonitory symptoms,” such as feeling lightheaded, nauseous, and heart palpitations (irregular heartbeats that feel like “fluttering” in the chest). If you have syncope, you will likely be able to keep from fainting if you sit or lie down and put your legs up if you feel these symptoms.

Syncope can be a sign of a more serious condition. So, it is important to get treatment right away after you have an episode of syncope. Most patients can prevent problems with syncope once they get an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.

What causes syncope?

Syncope can be caused by many things. Many patients have a medical condition they may or may not know about that affects the nervous system or heart. You may also have a condition that affects blood flow through your body and causes your blood pressure to drop when you change positions (for example, going from lying down to standing).

Types of Syncope

There are several different types of syncope. The type you have depends on what causes the problem.

Vasovagal syncope (also called cardio-neurogenic syncope)

Vasovagal syncope is the most common type of syncope. It is caused by a sudden drop in blood pressure, which causes a drop in blood flow to the brain. When you stand up, gravity causes blood to settle in the lower part of your body, below your diaphragm. When that happens, the heart and autonomic nervous system (ANS) work to keep your blood pressure stable.

Some patients with vasovagal syncope have a condition called orthostatic hypotension. This condition keeps the blood vessels from getting smaller (as they should) when the patient stands. This causes blood to collect in the legs and leads to a quick drop in blood pressure.

Situational syncope

Situational syncope is a type of vasovagal syncope. It happens only during certain situations that affect the nervous system and lead to syncope. Some of these situations are:

  • Dehydration
  • Intense emotional stress
  • Anxiety
  • Fear
  • Pain
  • Hunger
  • Use of alcohol or drugs
  • Hyperventilation (breathing in too much oxygen and getting rid of too much carbon dioxide too quickly)
  • Coughing forcefully, turning the neck, or wearing a tight collar (carotid sinus hypersensitivity)
  • Urinating (miturition syncope)
Postural syncope (also called postural hypotension)

Postural syncope is caused by a sudden drop in blood pressure due to a quick change in position, such as from lying down to standing. Certain medications and dehydration can lead to this condition. Patients with this type of syncope usually have changes in their blood pressure that cause it to drop by at least 20 mmHg (systolic/top number) and at least 10 mmHg (diastolic/bottom number) when they stand.

Cardiac syncope

Cardiac syncope is caused by a heart or blood vessel condition that affects blood flow to the brain. These conditions can include an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia), obstructed blood flow in the heart due to structural heart disease (the way the heart is formed), blockage in the cardiac blood vessels (myocardial ischemia), valve disease, aortic stenosis, blood clot, or heart failure. If you have cardiac syncope, it is important to see a cardiologist for proper treatment.

Neurologic syncope

Neurologic syncope is caused by a neurological condition such as seizure, stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Other less common conditions that lead to neurologic syncope include migraines and normal pressure hydrocephalus

Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS)

Postural-Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome is caused by a very fast heart rate (tachycardia) that happens when a person stands after sitting or lying down. The heart rate can speed up by 30 beats per minute or more. The increase usually happens within 10 minutes of standing. The condition is most common in women, but it can also occur in men.

Unknown Causes of Syncope

The cause of syncope is unknown In about one-third of patients. However, an increased risk of syncope is a side effect for some medications.

How is syncope diagnosed?

Doctor evaluation

If you have syncope, you should see your doctor, who can refer you to a syncope specialist for a complete evaluation.

The evaluation begins with a careful review of your medical history and a physical exam. Your doctor will ask you detailed questions about your symptoms and syncope episodes, including whether you have any symptoms before you faint and when and where the episodes happen.

You may then have one or more tests to help your doctor determine the cause of your syncope. These tests check things like the condition of your heart, how fast your heart is beating (heart rate), the amount of blood in your body (blood volume), and blood flow in different positions.

Tilt Test
Syncope evaluation

Your heart rate and blood pressure will be measured and recorded while you are in different positions including lying down, sitting and standing.

Tests to determine causes of syncope include:

The test results will help your doctor determine what is causing you to have syncope. You may need other tests, including electrophysiology studies, autonomic nervous system testing, neurological evaluation, and computed tomography (CT) scan. Vestibular function testing may be done to rule-out problems in the inner ear. If you need any additional testing, your doctor will explain them and why they are needed.

Getting the test results

Your referring physician will receive a complete report of test results and treatment recommendations. Your referring physician will share this information with you.

What are my treatment options?

Your treatment options will depend on what is causing your syncope and the results of your evaluation and testing. The goal of treatment is to keep you from having episodes of syncope.

Treatment options include:

  • Taking medications or making changes to medications you already take.
  • Wearing support garments or compression stockings to improve blood circulation.
  • Making changes to your diet. Your doctor may suggest that you eat small, frequent meals; eat more salt (sodium); drink more fluids, increase the amount of potassium in your diet; and avoid caffeine and alcohol.
  • Being extra cautious when you stand up.
  • Elevating the head of your bed while sleeping. You can do this by using extra pillows or by placing risers under the legs of the head of the bed.
  • Avoiding or changing the situations or “triggers” that cause a syncope episode.
    • Your family and those close to you should be aware of symptoms that lead to syncope and be prepared to help you by having you lie down and put your legs up.
  • Biofeedback training to control a fast heartbeat. You can get more information or schedule an appointment for an evaluation with a biofeedback specialist by calling the Cleveland Clinic Department of Psychology at 216.444.6115 or 800.223.2273 ext. 46115.
  • Treatment for structural heart disease.
  • Implanting a pacemaker to keep your heart rate regular (only needed for patients with certain medical conditions).
  • An implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). This device constantly monitors your heart rate and rhythm and corrects a fast, abnormal rhythm (only needed for patients with certain medical conditions).

Your doctor and other members of your healthcare team will develop a treatment plan that is right for you and talk to you about your treatment options.

If you are diagnosed with syncope, check your state laws. Some states require drivers with syncope to contact the license bureau.

How will syncope affect my life?

With the proper diagnosis and treatment, syncope can be managed and controlled. If you have had an episode of syncope, there is about a 30% chance you will have another episode. Your risk of another episode and how the condition affects you depends on several factors, including the cause and your age, gender and other medical problems you have. If you have questions about your risks, please talk to your doctor.

How do I find a doctor who specializes in syncope?

Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Syncope and Autonomic Disorders combines experience, expertise and a team approach to diagnosing syncope.

For patients beginning diagnosis of syncope, or those who have been told they have “autonomic dysfunction or neurologic causes for their syncope: make an appointment with a Neuromuscular Center staff member please call 216-636-5860 or toll free 866-588-2264.

For patients who have POTs, underlying cardiac disease, or cardiac symptoms along with their syncope: contact the cardiology appointment line at 1-800-223-2273, ext 4-6697.

If you have syncope, it is important for you and those close to you to know the signs and symptoms of an episode that can lead to fainting. Every patient is different, but common symptoms are feeling light headed, nauseous, and having cold, clammy skin. If you feel these symptoms, try counter-pressure techniques to prevent fainting. You should practice these exercises even when you do not have symptoms of syncope so you are familiar with each technique.


CPT-Hand-Grip

Handgrip

Hold a rubber ball in the hand you use to write. Squeeze the ball for as long as you can or until your symptoms disappear.


CPT-Arm-Tensing

Arm-Tensing

Grip one hand with the other and pull them against each other without letting go. Hold this grip as long as you can or until your symptoms disappear.


CPT-Leg-Crossing

Leg-Crossing

Cross one leg over the other and squeeze the muscles in your legs, abdomen and buttocks. Hold this position as long as you can or until your symptoms disappear.


Syncope research

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to syncope in laboratories at the NIH. The organizations support additional research through grants to major medical institutions across the country. Much of this research focuses on finding better ways to prevent and treat syncope.

Organization information

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
31 Center Drive, Rm. 4A21 MSC 2480
Bethesda, MD 20892-2480
Phone: 301.592.8573
TTY: 240.629.3255
Recorded Info: 800.575.WELL (9355)
Website: www.nhlbi.nih.gov

For more information, click on Contact Us or call the Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute Resource Center Nurse at 216.445.9288 or toll-free 866.289.6911.

Resources for Neurogenic Disorders
Such as Syncope, Dysautonomia and Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

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The inclusion of links to other websites does not imply any endorsement of the material on those websites nor any association with their operators.

Reference:

Syncope, Fouad-Tarazi, F, Laura Shoemaker L, Mayuga K, Jaeger F http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/cardiology/syncope/ Accessed September 4, 2014

Mayuga KA1, Butters KB, Fouad-Tarazi F.Early versus late postural tachycardia: a re-evaluation of a syndrome. Clin Auton Res. 2008 Jun;18(3):155-7. doi: 10.1007/s10286-008-0472-1. Epub 2008 May 9.http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10286-008-0472-1/fulltext.html Accessed 9/8/2014

Reviewed: 03/15

Talk to a Nurse: Mon. - Fri., 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. (ET)

Call a Heart & Vascular Nurse locally 216.445.9288 or toll-free 866.289.6911.

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This information is provided by Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

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