PAP Therapy

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866.588.2264

Toll-Free: 866.588.2264

The most common form of treatment today for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is the use of a Positive Airways Pressure (PAP) device. OSA is a condition in which the upper airway collapses during sleep, preventing the air from getting into your lungs. The PAP device holds the airway open by using air pressure that is introduced through the nose with a nose mask or similar device. The air travels down the back of the throat, and into your upper airway. The amount of air pressure set on your pap machine is determined during the sleep study.

There are two types of devices for PAP therapy:
  • CPAP (Continuous Positive Airways Pressure) – is the most widely used of the PAP devices.
  • Auto PAP – modifies the positive-pressure level applied during the night for the presence or absence of sleep-induced respiratory disorders.
  • Bi-Level – uses one pressure during inspiration, and a lower pressure during expiration.
  • Adaptive-Servo Ventilation (ASV) – a form of positive airway pressure that continuously monitors the patient's breathing pattern.

The machine will use a mask to deliver the air through your nose and/or mouth. These devices are available in various sizes and styles to fit individual needs. Your Cleveland Clinic sleep specialist or technologist will fit you with the most effective and comfortable mask possible. Please contact us if you ever feel you would need to be refitted or need a replacement mask.

Is the PAP machine difficult to use?

It will take some time for you to get used to the new equipment and it may take a while for you to begin to feel the benefits of PAP therapy. If you are having problems adjusting to your machine, please contact us for help.

Frequently Asked Questions

»What are the benefits of PAP therapy?

PAP therapy will increase your energy levels; improve your mental alertness, your mood, your quality of sleep, and your quality of life.

»Is the PAP machine difficult to use?

It will take some time for you to get used to the new equipment and it may take a while for you to begin to feel the benefits of PAP therapy. If you are having problems adjusting to your machine, please contact us for help.

»If I lose weight, will I cure my OSA?

That depends. Some people have shown decreased symptoms from OSA after losing weight and were removed from their PAP machine; others have not. However, if you are overweight, losing weight will always improve your health and decrease your risks of developing other health issues.

»How long will I need to use this machine?

PAP therapy is just that—therapy. As long as you have OSA, you need to do something to improve your quality of sleep. Today, after many years of experimenting with surgeries, oral appliances, special bed pillows, etc, positive airway pressure is the gold standard for relieving and improving symptoms of OSA.

» Is this covered by my insurance?

At CCHCS, upon receiving your PAP order, we contact your insurance company to verify that they will cover your machine. Based on your plan, you may have a co-payment every month or not. The insurance company also informs us at to how many months they will pay before the equipment is converted to a purchase.

PAP-NAP

The PAP-Nap is a daytime procedure offered to patients expressing resistance or hesitation toward the diagnosis of a sleep related breathing disorder and treatment with Positive Airway Pressure (PAP) therapy.

PAP therapy is improved with increased individual or group education, close clinical follow-up, sleep technologist/technician coaching, telephone calls, and objective data monitoring. The PAP-Nap is an abbreviated in-lab, cardio-respiratory recording which is attended by a technologist geared toward improving patients’ PAP compliance.

This procedure is offered as an adjunct option in the setting of PAP therapy and is intended for patients who suffer from sleep related breathing disorders and co-morbid conditions such as insomnia, anxiety, panic attacks, and claustrophobia.

The procedure itself can range from 60–180 minutes in length, during which the patient has individual coaching and counseling by a sleep technologist to overcome emotional or imagery barriers with PAP therapy and to desensitize the patient to masks and pressure sensations.

The patient is given the opportunity to sleep with PAP therapy after going through this desensitization period. The goal of this procedure is to expose and acclimate the patient to this therapy method which will then improve their overall compliance on a nightly basis when using PAP therapy at home.

What do you want to do next?

Request an Appointment

216.444.2165 call the Sleep Center.

866.588.2264 call toll-free.

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