Appointments

866.320.4573

Request an Appointment

Questions

800.223.2273

Contact us with Questions

Live Chat hours:  M-F 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. ET

Expand Content

Treatments & Procedures

Childhood Immunization Schedule

Vaccine Recommended age at which the vaccines should be received*
*Certain vaccines can be given within a range of ages. This chart represents one recommended schedule. Your child's pediatrician may follow different guidelines. Please consult with your child's pediatrician for specific recommendations.
**The influenza vaccine is given annually. The initial dose can be given as early as 6 months of age.
Birth Hepatitis B
2 months of age DTaP - Diphtheria, Tetanus, Acellular Pertussis
IVP - Inactivated Polio vaccine
Hepatitis B
Pneumococcal vaccine
HIB - Haemophilus influenza Type B
Rotavirus vaccine
4 months of age DTaP
IVP
Pneumococcal vaccine
HIB
Rotavirus vaccine
6 months of age DTaP
IVP
Hepatitis B
Pneumococcal vaccine
HIB
Influenza vaccine**
Rotavirus vaccine
12 months of age MMR - Measles, Mumps, Rubella
Pneumococcal vaccine
Hepatitis A
15 months of age DTaP
HIB
Varicella
18 months of age Hepatitis A
4 to 6 years of age DTaP
MMR
IVP
Varicella
11 years of age to adult Tdap
Meningococcal vaccine
HPV (human papilloma vaccine)
Hepatitis B

Three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine are generally given – the first dose is usually given within 12 hours of birth, the second at about 2 months, and the third at about 6 months of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible based on the mother’s hepatitis B surface antigen status and the potential use of combination vaccines. Your pediatrician will discuss these issues with you.

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis

Five doses of the diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis combination vaccine are given, with the first dose usually given at 2 months of age, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, the fourth at about 15 months of age, and the fifth at about 5 years of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible. Your pediatrician will discuss these issues with you.

Inactivated Polio

Four doses of the inactivated polio vaccine are given, with the first dose given at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at about 6 months, and the fourth at about 5 years of age.

Pediarix

Pediarix is a combination vaccine that can help protect against five serious diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, and polio. Pediarix is typically given at 2, 4, and 6 months of age.

Haemophilus influenzae Type b

Four doses of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine are given. The first at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, and the fourth at about 12 months of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible. Your pediatrician will discuss these issues with you.

RotaTeq

RotaTeq is a vaccine that can help protect against rotavirus, which is a viral infection that can cause fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. The vaccine is given by mouth at three different times, each about one to two months apart.

Measles, Mumps, Rubella

Two doses of the measles, mumps, and rubella combination vaccine are given, with the first dose given at about 12 months of age and the second given at about 5 years of age.

Varicella

Two doses of the varicella (chickenpox) vaccine are usually given at about 12 months of age and at 4 to 6 years of age.

Pneumococcal Vaccine

Four doses of the pneumococcal vaccine are usually given. The first is given at 2 months of age, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, and the fourth at about 12 months of age.

Hepatitis A

The hepatitis A vaccine is given to protect against one type of hepatitis, hepatitis A. Hepatitis is a type of liver disease. The vaccine is typically given as a two-dose series, with the first shot given at the age of 1 and the second around 6 months later.

Menactra

Menactra is a vaccine given to protect against meningococcal disease, which is a serious bacterial infection that can cause meningitis—severe swelling of the brain and spinal cord. It can also lead to sepsis—a dangerous and potentially life-threatening blood infection.

Gardasil

Gardasil is a vaccine given to help protect against diseases caused by certain types of human papillomavirus. These diseases include:

  • Cervical cancer (cancer of the lower end of the uterus or womb)
  • Abnormal and precancerous cervical lesions, vaginal lesions, vulvar lesions
  • Anal, penile cancer
  • Genital warts
  • Head/neck cancer

The Gardasil vaccine is given in three doses, ideally as:

  • First dose: at a date you and your health care professional choose
  • Second dose: 2 months after the first dose
  • Third dose: 6 months after the first dose

Other vaccines

Additional vaccines may be recommended for certain children at high risk. Your pediatrician will advise you about the need for these vaccines as well as provide a revised vaccination schedule for those patients who miss receiving a vaccine at the recommended time frames.

© Copyright 1995-2014 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. All rights reserved.

Can't find the health information you’re looking for?

This information is provided by the Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition. This document was last reviewed on: 10/15/2012…#11288