An extracranial carotid artery aneurysm is a bulging or ballooning in the wall of the carotid artery in the neck.

What is surgical repair for an extracranial carotid artery aneurysm?

The mainstay of treatment of extracranial carotid artery aneurysms is surgical repair. The surgical repair entails the resection of that portion of the carotid artery that is involved with the aneurysm, followed by a bypass.

Why is this procedure performed? Why do I need this procedure?

Symptoms for carotid artery aneurysms may include transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or stroke. In addition, carotid artery aneurysms may form clots that block blood flow to your brain. If this occurs, or in order to prevent this from occurring, treatment may be warranted.

Other symptoms can occur secondary to pressure of the aneurysm on surrounding structures such as veins and nerves. These symptoms can vary, depending upon what is compressed, but may include facial swelling, hoarseness or difficulty swallowing. Rarely, carotid artery aneurysms can rupture, or burst, which is a life-threatening problem.

Each patient is evaluated, and treatment will be individualized for the patient’s circumstances.

Where is the procedure performed and who performs this procedure?

This procedure is performed in the hospital surgical suite by a vascular surgeon.

How do I find out if I am a candidate for this procedure?

To find out if you are a candidate for this procedure, please call the Vascular Surgery Department at 216.444.4508 or 800.223.2273 ext. 4-4508.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 04/29/2019.

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