Speech, language and swallowing rehabilitation therapy is a service provided by a speech-language pathologist. These highly qualified professionals are licensed in the evaluation and treatment of articulation, language, stuttering, voice, cognition and swallowing disorders.

Who should receive speech and swallowing rehabilitation therapy?

Cleveland Clinic Rehabilitation and Sports Therapy offers a comprehensive range of speech and swallowing services for individuals from pediatrics through geriatrics. Evaluation and treatment services are available for:

Neurological Conditions:
  • Stroke
  • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
  • Neuromuscular speech disorders resulting from Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's Disease) as well as other conditions
  • Geriatric-related conditions (patient/family education and counseling for Alzheimer’s Disease, dementia, cognitive changes)
Pediatric Conditions:
  • Speech and language disorders
Other Speech and Swallowing Conditions:
  • Swallowing disorders (dysphagia)
  • Voice disorders
  • Articulation disorders
  • Stuttering/fluency

What does speech and swallowing rehabilitation involve?

Our speech-language pathologists will evaluate the specific needs of the patient and select a technique or a combination of techniques to serve the individual’s needs. Techniques can include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Articulation improvement
  • Aphasia/Language therapy
  • Cognitive retraining for memory and attention as well as organizing and planning
  • Computer aided speech or alternative non-vocal communication
  • Swallowing therapy/modified barium swallowing exam
  • Stuttering/fluency
  • Voice improvement
  • Patient and family education

How long will speech and swallowing rehabilitation therapy take?

The speech-language or swallowing evaluation is completed on a one-on-one basis and can typically last for one hour. If treatment is recommended, follow up visits range from 45 -60 minutes in length. The duration and frequency of treatment ranges for each individual person and will be determined by the evaluating speech-language pathologist.