Coaching Program

Coaching Program

The Resident Coaching Program’s (RCP) goal is to promote resident awareness of their growth and development, enhance resiliency, and improve trainee confidence in their own self-assessment and self-directed learning. We are dedicated to helping all residents reach their full potential and ability, and this program is designed to provide the tools and support to get there. Participation is voluntary and strongly encouraged and residents who request a coach are matched with a Cleveland Clinic staff physician. Coaching is distinct from mentoring, and is specifically designed to promote self-reflection and focus on individual strengths with the goal of enhancing growth within your career as a resident physician. The RCP is about taking you from good to great and maximizing your potential.

FRAME

FRAME

FRAME (Foundations of Resident Assessment, Mentorship, and Emotional intelligence) education is unique to The Cleveland Clinic Internal Medicine Residency Program, and focuses on emotional intelligence, diversity development, communication, empathy, professionalism, teamwork, leadership, ethics and humanism. This innovative and interactive conference series is attended by residents on their Y week to discover more about how their worldview contributes to themselves as a physician and person. Designed to foster strong longitudinal relationships among residents and program faculty, FRAME empowers resident physicians with the ability to create stronger, deeper, and more meaningful relationships with their patients and colleagues.  In both large and small group learning, FRAME cultivates a nonjudgmental setting in which residents can examine and explore new competencies, ingrained beliefs, values and curricular elements that are congruent with the program’s mission and the future of healthcare.

Our key goals are to:

  • Foster longitudinal and strong relationships among residents and program staff
  • Create learning structures and social environments in which residents identify and belong
  • Cultivate a comfortable setting in which residents examine and explore elements of the physician experience congruent with the program’s mission
  • Incorporate new and important competencies into the curriculum such as emotional intelligence, teamwork, and resilience
  • Promote empathy, self-care, humanism, relationship building, and self-awareness

Residents participate in interactive, facilitated discussions and interactive experiences that are guided by senior physician faculty. Curricular elements discussed include medical teaching, emotional intelligence, communication and empathy, professionalism, teamwork, leadership, ethics, and humanism. Meaningful interactions and exchange of ideas between residents within these small groups provide a natural avenue for enriched relationships and deeper understanding of each other as human beings.

Clinical Reasoning Conference (CRC)

Clinical Reasoning Conference (CRC)

Clinical reasoning is an essential skill for the expert clinician. Clinical reasoning examines how we think and synthesize vast amounts of data including patient preference. When facing an unusual clinical scenario, clinicians have the ability to switch to an intuitive and fast mode, or the more thoughtful, deductive, and time consuming mode. Clinical reasoning also includes the ability to identify when each system is required and efficiently switch between them.

Utilizing game-based instruction, interactive small group discussions, and large group exercises, this conference helps the residents reflect on clinical cases that highlight cognitive biases. In an engaging and fun learning environment, the residents develop a heightened awareness of their thought processes and the myriad cognitive biases that challenge our clinical reasoning. Through this reflection, the residents equip themselves with metacognition as a strategy to prevent cognitive and diagnostic errors and improve their clinical reasoning and patient safety.

Modified Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

Modified Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

We are proud to be one of the first programs in the country to have a formal longitudinal problem based learning (PBL) curriculum in graduate medical education. While similar to traditional PBL, Modified Problem Based Learning (mPBL) differs in some finer aspects. The focus lies on self-directed learning and discussing learning objectives (LOs) derived from a clinical case in the presence of a multidisciplinary team of experts.

During the shorter, first session, each small group determines its LOs with the input of core faculty. The second session focuses on group discussion of the LOs. During this session, specialists of various fields serve as expert facilitators/moderators to ensure real-time patient based learning. This resident-led learning is supplemented with faculty facilitation which provides a more concrete understanding of medical concepts as well as correct interpretation of the latest information and literature. This approach aligns with adult learning theories as it allows learner control over the content and process of their learning. mPBL is incorporated in our rotational structure and occurs during protected education time in two half days of longitudinal clinic week.

To augment the experience, we combine our mPBL curriculum with our video library innovations.

Quality & Patient Safety

Quality & Patient Safety

Quality & Patient Safety Conferences

High-Value Care (HVC)

Value-based healthcare is about ensuring patients get the right care, at the right time, in the right setting. It also involves helping patients avoid unnecessary care. Opportunities exist to manage spending related to health care, while maintaining or enhancing the quality of care and improving overall health outcomes.

The goal of our High Value Care Conference is to increase resident awareness of value, quality, and cost of care. The conferences are case-based and cover common medical topics such as syncope, upper GI bleed, and low back pain. During the conference, there is a review of evidence-based diagnostic and treatment strategies for the condition being discussed. Charges for the workup and management are reviewed, and residents work in small groups to identify high and low value diagnostic and management strategies.

Morbidity & Mortality (M&M)

Morbidity & Morality (M&M) is held monthly and examines adverse patient outcomes from the quality improvement and systems-based practice lenses. M&M helps to identify areas of improvement within a safe and supportive environment with the goal of improving patient outcomes.

Quality & Patient Safety Education

Quality-Patient Safety Elective

We offer a 1-week nonclinical elective with the goal of providing advanced education in Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. In this elective, residents learn about Root Cause Analysis (RCA) and complete an RCA over the course of the week on a real safety event at the Cleveland Clinic. The elective also includes discussion of QI scholarship through Journal Clubs, guest lectures from institutional leaders, and observation of safety meetings across the enterprise. Experiential patient safety learning includes shadowing opportunities of non-physician caregivers and Lab and Pharmacy tours.

Quality Improvement Education

In the intern and second year, residents participate in a longitudinal, experiential quality improvement (QI) curriculum. Our residents learn QI methodology while working on quality improvement projects, largely focused in the ambulatory setting. Residents achieve excellent scholarship from this experience, including poster and oral presentations at local, regional and national meetings.

Additional Conferences

Additional Conferences

"Back to the Bedside: Physical Exam Series": A new initiative where residents practice focused examinations under the direction of faculty members.

Esteemed Educator Series: Invited Department Chairs and Professors across all departments deliver lectures to the residents on their area of expertise.

Medicine Grand Rounds: One hour presentation every Thursday morning by selected faculty and invited speakers known for their expertise in an area of medicine. MGR is designed to provide both faculty and residents with updates in medicine and its subspecialties.

Intern Academic Half Day: Three hours every Tuesday is protected educational time for interns. Didactics include: Intern Survival Series, Intern Case Conference, and teaching from faculty. This is protected educational time, even when on inpatient rotations.