Fam-Trastuzumab Deruxtecan Injection

Fam-trastuzumab injection treats a certain type of inoperable breast cancer that has spread to other parts of your body or has come back after previous breast cancer treatment.

What is this medication?

FAM-TRASTUZUMAB DERUXTECAN (fam-tras TOOZ eu mab DER ux TEE kan) treats some types of cancer. It works by blocking a protein that causes cancer cells to grow and multiply. This helps to slow or stop the spread of cancer cells.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): ENHERTU

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What should I tell my care team before I take this medication?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Heart disease
  • Heart failure
  • Infection, especially a viral infection, such as chickenpox, cold sores, or herpes
  • Liver disease
  • Lung or breathing disease, such as asthma or COPD
  • An unusual or allergic reaction to fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan, other medications, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • Pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • Breast-feeding

How should I use this medication?

This medication is injected into a vein. It is given by your care team in a hospital or clinic setting.

A special MedGuide will be given to you before each treatment. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your care team about the use of this medication in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

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What if I miss a dose?

It is important not to miss your dose. Call your care team if you are unable to keep an appointment.

What may interact with this medication?

Interactions are not expected.

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

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What should I watch for while using this medication?

Visit your care team for regular checks on your progress. Tell your care team if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse.

Your condition will be monitored carefully while you are receiving this medication.

Do not become pregnant while taking this medication or for 7 months after stopping it. Women should inform their care team if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. Men should not father a child while taking this medication and for 4 months after stopping it. There is potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Talk to your care team for more information.

Do not breast-feed an infant while taking this medication or for 7 months after the last dose.

This medication has caused decreased sperm counts in some men. This may make it more difficult to father a child. Talk to your care team if you are concerned about your fertility.

This medication may increase your risk to bruise or bleed. Call your care team if you notice any unusual bleeding.

Be careful brushing or flossing your teeth or using a toothpick because you may get an infection or bleed more easily. If you have any dental work done, tell your dentist you are receiving this medication.

This medication may cause dry eyes and blurred vision. If you wear contact lenses, you may feel some discomfort. Lubricating eye drops may help. See your care team if the problem does not go away or is severe.

This medication may increase your risk of getting an infection. Call your care team for advice if you get a fever, chills, sore throat, or other symptoms of a cold or flu. Do not treat yourself. Try to avoid being around people who are sick.

Avoid taking medications that contain aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen unless instructed by your care team. These medications may hide a fever.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medication?

Side effects that you should report to your care team as soon as possible:

  • Allergic reactions—skin rash, itching, hives, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • Dry cough, shortness of breath or trouble breathing
  • Infection—fever, chills, cough, sore throat, wounds that don't heal, pain or trouble when passing urine, general feeling of discomfort or being unwell
  • Heart failure—shortness of breath, swelling of the ankles, feet, or hands, sudden weight gain, unusual weakness or fatigue
  • Unusual bruising or bleeding

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report these to your care team if they continue or are bothersome):

  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Hair loss
  • Muscle pain
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medication?

This medication is given in a hospital or clinic. It will not be stored at home.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

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Note: Introduction and Additional Common Questions written and medically approved by Cleveland Clinic professionals.

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