What is this medication?

PERAMIVIR (per AM i veer) is an antiviral medicine. It treats some kinds of influenza or the flu. It will not work for colds or other viral infections.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Rapivab

What should I tell my care team before I take this medication?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

How should I use this medication?

This medicine is injected into a vein. It is given by a health care provider in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your health care provider about the use of this medicine in children. While it may be given to children as young as 6 months for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply. This medicine is not for regular use.

What may interact with this medication?

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medication?

Visit your health care provider for regular checks on your progress. Tell your health care provider if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse.

This medicine may cause serious skin reactions. They can happen weeks to months after starting the medicine. Contact your health care provider right away if you notice fevers or flu-like symptoms with a rash. The rash may be red or purple and then turn into blisters or peeling of the skin. Or, you might notice a red rash with swelling of the face, lips or lymph nodes in your neck or under your arms.

If you have the flu, you may be at an increased risk of developing confusion or abnormal behavior. This occurs early in the illness, and more frequently in children and teens. These events are not common, but may result in accidental injury to the patient. Families and caregivers of patients should watch for signs of unusual behavior and contact a health care provider right away if the patient shows signs of unusual behavior.

This medicine is not a substitute for the flu shot. Talk to your health care provider each year about an annual flu shot.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medication?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medication?

This medicine is given in a hospital or clinic. It will not be stored at home.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

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