What is this medication?

METHYLERGONOVINE (meth il er goe NOE veen) is an ergot alkaloid. It is mostly used to prevent or to treat excessive bleeding after childbirth.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Methergine

What should I tell my care team before I take this medication?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • circulation problems
  • heart disease
  • high blood pressure
  • infection
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to methylergonovine, ergot alkaloids, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medication?

This medicine is injected into a muscle or into a vein. It is given by a health care provider in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your health care provider about the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply. This medicine is not for regular use.

What may interact with this medication?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • certain antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, or troleandomycin
  • certain antivirals for HIV or hepatitis
  • conivaptan
  • grapefruit juice
  • imatinib
  • medicines for fungal infections like itraconazole, ketoconazole, and voriconazole
  • medicines used to treat migraines like almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, or zolmitriptan
  • nefazodone
  • other ergot alkaloids like ergotamine, dihydroergotamine

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • certain medicines for blood pressure, heart disease, irregular heart beat
  • clotrimazole
  • decongestants like phenylephrine and pseudoephedrine
  • fluconazole
  • fluoxetine
  • fluvoxamine
  • medicines used for surgery
  • nitrates like nitroglycerin
  • pseudoephedrine
  • stimulant medicines for attention disorders, weight loss, or staying awake
  • zileuton

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medication?

Visit your care team for regular checks on your progress. Tell your care team if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse. Follow the instructions of your care team after childbirth.

Do not breast-feed while taking this medication and for 12 hours after the last dose. Talk to your care team for more information.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medication?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
  • decreased hearing, ringing in the ears
  • fast, irregular heartbeat
  • increased blood pressure
  • pain or tightness in the chest, neck, back, or arms
  • pain, tingling, or numbness in the hands or feet
  • seizures
  • stroke (changes in vision; confusion; trouble speaking or understanding; severe headaches; sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg; trouble walking; dizziness; loss of balance or coordination)
  • sweating
  • vomiting

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • changes in taste
  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • nausea
  • pelvic pain or cramps

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medication?

This medicine is given in a hospital or clinic. It will not be stored at home.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

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