What is this medication?

GLIPIZIDE (GLIP i zide) treats type 2 diabetes. It works by increasing insulin levels in your body, which decreases your blood sugar (glucose). It also helps your body use insulin more effectively. It belongs to a group of medications called sulfonylureas. Changes to diet and exercise are often combined with this medication.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Glucotrol

What should I tell my care team before I take this medication?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency
  • Heart disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease
  • Porphyria
  • Severe infection or injury
  • Thyroid disease
  • An unusual or allergic reaction to glipizide, sulfa medications, other medications, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • Pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • Breast-feeding

How should I use this medication?

Take this medication by mouth. Swallow with a drink of water. Do not take with food. Take it 30 minutes before a meal. Follow the directions on the prescription label. If you take this medication once a day, take it 30 minutes before breakfast. Take your doses at the same time each day. Do not take more often than directed.

Talk to your care team about the use of this medication in children. Special care may be needed.

Elderly patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medication?

  • Bosentan
  • Chloramphenicol
  • Cisapride
  • Clarithromycin
  • Medications for fungal or yeast infections
  • Metoclopramide
  • Probenecid
  • Warfarin

Many medications may cause an increase or decrease in blood sugar, these include:

  • Alcohol containing beverages
  • Aspirin and aspirin-like medications
  • Chloramphenicol
  • Chromium
  • Diuretics
  • Female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills
  • Heart medications
  • Isoniazid
  • Male hormones or anabolic steroids
  • Medications for weight loss
  • Medications for allergies, asthma, cold, or cough
  • Medications for mental problems
  • Medications called MAO Inhibitors like Nardil, Parnate, Marplan, Eldepryl
  • Niacin
  • NSAIDs, medications for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen
  • Pentamidine
  • Phenytoin
  • Probenecid
  • Quinolone antibiotics like ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ofloxacin
  • Some herbal dietary supplements
  • Steroid medications like prednisone or cortisone
  • Thyroid medication

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medication?

Visit your care team for regular checks on your progress.

A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months.

Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them.

Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once.

Tell your care team if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medication. If you are sick or exercising more than usual, you might need to change the dose of your medication.

Do not skip meals. Ask your care team if you should avoid alcohol. Many nonprescription cough and cold products contain sugar or alcohol. These can affect blood sugar.

This medication can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths.

Wear a medical ID bracelet or chain, and carry a card that describes your disease and details of your medication and dosage times.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medication?

Side effects that you should report to your care team as soon as possible:

  • Allergic reactions—skin rash, itching, hives, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)—tremors or shaking, anxiety, sweating, cold or clammy skin, confusion, dizziness, rapid heartbeat
  • Hemolytic anemia—unusual weakness or fatigue, dizziness, headache, trouble breathing, dark urine, yellowing skin or eyes

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your care team if they continue or are bothersome):

  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Gas
  • Nausea
  • Tremors or shaking

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medication?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature below 30 degrees C (86 degrees F). Throw away any unused medication after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

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