How often should I go to the dentist?

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for checkups and cleanings.

Why are twice a year appointments necessary?

The main reasons are:

  • So that your dentist can check for problems that you might not see or feel
  • To allow your dentist to find early signs of decay (Decay doesn’t become visible or cause pain until it reaches more advanced stages.)
  • To treat any other oral health problems found (Generally, the earlier a problem is found, the more manageable it is.)

Are there people who need more frequent or less frequent appointments?

Twice yearly appointments work well for most people; however, there are some people who may need to be seen more often. Such people include those who have:

  • Gum disease
  • Family members with a history of plaque build-up or cavities
  • A weakened immune system (the body’s own ability to fight off infections and diseases)
  • Experienced certain life events -- particularly those that cause stress or illness. Under these circumstances, changes in the mouth or an infection could occur.

On the other hand, people who have taken great care of their teeth and gums and have gone years without any problems might need to see the dentist less often.

Ask your dentist what visitation schedule works best for your state of dental health.

If I am visiting a new dentist for the first time, what essential information do I need to share with the dentist?

Your new dentist will want to learn about your oral health so that he or she can notice changes or problems more easily during future visits. First, however, even before the review of your oral health, your dentist will want to know more about your general health. Areas that he or she will discuss include:

  • Medical history/current medicines: Your dentist will want to know if you have been diagnosed with any diseases. It is important to tell your dentist all of your health issues, not just those you think relate to your mouth. Several diseases, diabetes for example, can increase the risk of gum disease, may require use of a different anesthesia or even a different approach to treatments or prevention. Bring a list of all medicines you are currently taking and their dosages. Some medicines can cause dry mouth, which can increase your risk of cavities. Other important reasons for your dentist to know your medicines are so that he or she doesn’t prescribe a medicine that could interact with one you are already taking and to change the type of anesthesia given, if necessary.
  • Current dental health: Don’t hesitate to tell your dentist if you think you have a new cavity, sensitive teeth, feel any lumps or bumps, or have any oral health concerns. By informing your dentist of any symptoms you might be experiencing, you might help him or her make an early diagnosis.
  • Dental fears: Let your dentist know if you have any fears about going to the dentist or receiving dental care. Dental treatments have changed drastically from years ago and so have pain management options. Your dentist will discuss ways to ease your fears, minimize pain, and make you feel more comfortable.

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