Give Online: Help shape patient care for generations to come.
Cleveland Clinic Logo

Appointments

Request an Appointment

Cancer Answer Line:
866.223.8100

M-F 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. ET

Expand Content

Types of Blood & Marrow Transplants

Contact Us

Cleveland Clinic performs bone marrow/peripheral blood stem cells/umbilical cord blood transplants for disorders including:

Cleveland Clinic’s Blood and Marrow Transplant Program has expertise in all types of transplants, including:

Autologous (Self-Donated)

Autologous Transplantation – An autologous transplant involves high-dose chemotherapy followed by infusion of the patient’s own previously collected peripheral blood stem cells. The chemotherapy treatments are given to eliminate cancer cells (disease) in the body. Infusion of peripheral blood stem cells replaces the marrow destroyed by the chemotherapy.

Allogeneic (Donor) Transplants Using Matched Sibling

Allogeneic Transplantation – An allogeneic transplant involves high-dose chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy flowed by infusion of donor bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cells or cord blood. The marrow, stem cells or cord blood comes from an appropriately HLA (immune)-matched related or unrelated donor.

Allogeneic Transplants Using Unrelated Donors

Allogeneic Transplantation – An allogeneic transplant involves high-dose chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy flowed by infusion of donor bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cells or cord blood. The marrow, stem cells or cord blood comes from an appropriately HLA (immune)-matched related or unrelated donor.

Allogeneic Transplants Using Haploidentical (Half-Matched) Donors

Haploidentical Donor Transplantation – This procedure uses HLA half-matched (haplotype) donors such as biological parents, children or half-matched siblings for allogeneic transplantation. The ability to use Haploidentical donors is of special relevance to patients who previously had very limited sibling and unrelated donor options.

Allogeneic Transplants Using Umbilical Cord Blood

Allogeneic Transplantation – An allogeneic transplant involves high-dose chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy flowed by infusion of donor bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cells or cord blood. The marrow, stem cells or cord blood comes from an appropriately HLA (immune)-matched related or unrelated donor.

Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Transplants

Reduced Intensity Transplantation – These allogeneic transplants user smaller doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation. This treatment option is for patients who may not be able to tolerate a full-intensity or myeloablative allogeneic transplant (for example, older patients or those with multiple medical issues). Reduced intensity transplants are done on an inpatient or outpatient basis depending on the treatment plan.

Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

Peripheral blood stem cells are collected in a process called apheresis. This is performed in the therapeutic apheresis outpatient unit. The specially trained nurses in this unit perform more than 2,000 apheresis procedures a year. During the procedure, blood from a large vein flows through a central venous catheter to a cell separation machine where it is processed. The machine collects peripheral blood stem cells and the rest of the blood is returned.

Bone Marrow

Cleveland Clinic has performed these procedures since 1976. A bone marrow harvest is done as an outpatient surgical procedure, with the patient (donor) under general anesthesia. A small portion of bone marrow – the soft, spongy substance that fills the inner cavities of bones and produces blood – is collected for transplantation, using a needle that passes through the skin and into marrow cavity of the hip bone.

Umbilical Cord Blood

For patients without a related or unrelated donor, publicly banked umbilical cord blood can be used to perform allogeneic transplantation. One or two umbilical cord blood units are used to provide blood stem cells for bone marrow recovery after chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy.

Cancer Answers & Appointments

Speak with a cancer nurse specialist for appointment assistance and for answers to your questions about cancer locally at 216.444.7923 or toll-free 1.866.223.8100.

Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (ET).

Referrals

Resources for medical professionals

  • Outpatient appointment referrals: 216.444.7923 or 866.223.8100
  • Inpatient hospital transfers: 800.553.5056
  • Referring Physician Concierge: 216.444.6196 or 216.312.4910.

Clinical Trials

Search available cancer clinical trials by disease, hospital, phase or number.