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Transcript for Video Assisted Heart Surgery

Questions and Answers about Video Assisted Valve Surgery - Transcript

Video by Jose Navia, M.D.

Jose Navia, M.D.

Specialties: adult acquired heart disease, minimally invasive robotic and video-assisted cardiac surgery, off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, minimally invasive mitral and aortic valve surgery, heart transplantation, ventricular assist devices, surgical electrical therapies for heart failure and arrhythmia surgery

Learn more about Dr. Navia

Watch the video


Hello. I’m Dr. Jose Luis Navia, staff member of the Department of  Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

At Cleveland Clinic, our surgical team has the largest experience repairing and replacing heart valves in the United States.

We perform more than 2,000 heart valve surgeries each year, including valve repair and replacement of the mitral, aortic, and tricuspid valve.

As often as possible, we try to use a minimally invasive approach to valve surgery. In fact, minimally invasive valve surgeries account for more than 85 percent of the minimally invasive heart surgeries performed at Cleveland Clinic.

A minimally invasive approach means that incisions are half the size of traditional open surgery incisions. For example, using a minimally invasive approach requires an incision between three and four inches long. An incision for traditional valve surgery is about six to eight inches long.

Advances in cardiopulmonary perfusion, instrumentation, and intracardiac visualization, have facilitated this rapid technological shift.

Over the past 5 years, minimally invasive valve surgery has evolved from modified conventional methods to radical changes in micro and port incisions.

For mitral and or tricuspid valve repair or replacement, we offer a minimally invasive technique that involves the use of video navigation. This procedure is called video-assisted valve surgery.

Video Assisted Surgery Incision

Video-assisted surgery incision

This new technique offers two extra benefits over the standard minimally invasive. The first is that we can operate without having to break the patient’s breastbone or sternum. The second benefit is that the surgery offers a better cosmetic outcome: a small scar on the side of the chest, rather than a long scar down the front of the chest.

Also, this minimally invasive approach can reduce blood loss, pain and trauma, as well as the chance of infection and length of hospital stay. Sometimes patients stay only three days versus five to six days with traditional open heart surgery.

Mitral valve leaflet can be nicely repaired and the annuloplasty ring perfectly placed with the minimally invasive video assisted surgery.

Thank you very much for your attention.

For more information:

If you do not find what you are looking for about video assisted and minimally invasive valve surgery, contact us or call the Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute Resource & Information Nurse at 216.445.9288 or toll-free at 866.289.6911. We would be happy to help you.

Talk to a Nurse: Mon. - Fri., 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. (ET)

Call a Heart & Vascular Nurse locally 216.445.9288 or toll-free 866.289.6911.

Schedule an Appointment

Toll-free 800.659.7822

This information is provided by Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

© Copyright 2015 Cleveland Clinic. All rights reserved.

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