Appointments

866.320.4573

Request an Appointment

Questions

800.223.2273

Contact us with Questions

Expand Content

Follow Up Care & Resources

After you leave the hospital, you will need to see your health care team for follow up appointments. It is very important to keep these appointments to make sure you receive the best possible care to meet your individual needs.

Your first appointment will be with a certified nurse practitioner (CNP) 3-7 days after you leave the hospital. This appointment will be scheduled before you are discharged. Your next appointment will be 6 weeks after your visit with the CNP.

A report of the surgery and your progress during your hospital stay will be sent to your referring cardiologist. Call him or her as soon as you return home to make a follow-up appointment. You will need to see your cardiologist six to eight weeks after the surgery to determine how well you are healing. At this appointment, your doctor will give you instructions on driving, returning to work, and medications. Then, your doctor will tell you how often you should return. A plan of regular follow-up visits (at least once a year) is advised.

Be sure to follow your doctor’s guidelines on managing certain risk factors, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, obesity and smoking. Your doctor can provide a full risk factor evaluation and a schedule for regular follow-up visits to reduce the development or progression of coronary artery disease and reduce the risk of future complications.

If you had valve surgery, you will need to take precautions to reduce the risk of infective endocarditis. This includes taking antibiotics before you undergo any procedure that may cause bleeding such as dental work, invasive tests and surgery. Your doctor will give you more specific guidelines about reducing your risk.

*A new browser window will open with this link. The inclusion of links to other web sites does not imply any endorsement of the material on the web sites or any association with their operators.

What is Mended Hearts?

Mended Hearts is a national organization dedicated to providing support and inspiring hope in heart disease patients and their families for more than 60 years. Mended Hearts of Greater Cleveland is a chapter of this national nonprofit organization. Mended Hearts helps people understand that there can be a rich, rewarding life after a heart event. They bring patients, families and caregivers together to form a network of caring individuals. Members listen, share their experiences and learn from healthcare professionals.

*A new browser window will open with this link.

Reviewed: 01/14

Talk to a Nurse: Mon. - Fri., 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. (ET)

Call a Heart & Vascular Nurse locally 216.445.9288 or toll-free 866.289.6911.

Schedule an Appointment

Toll-free 800.659.7822

This information is provided by Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

© Copyright 2014 Cleveland Clinic. All rights reserved.

HealthHub from Cleveland Clinic

Read the Latest from Our Experts About cctopics » Heart & Vascular Health
High Blood Pressure? Don’t Take Vitamin D for It (Video)
11/20/14 8:31 a.m.
Sellers of vitamin D claim the nutrient can lower your blood pressure. But don’t believe the hype. Despite claims from the nutrition industry and non-medical personnel abou...
by Steven Nissen, MD
When Your Heart Stents Narrow, Brachytherapy Can Help
11/19/14 8:22 a.m.
Cardiac stents are an effective, nonsurgical way of holding a narrowed or blocked artery open to increase blood...
A Post ER Follow-Up Could Save Your Life
11/17/14 8:39 a.m.
Even if Emergency Room doctors say you didn’t actually have a heart attack, that doesn’t mean you h...
Recipe: Low-Fat Crunchy Pumpkin Pie
11/14/14 7:00 a.m.
This low-fat crunchy pumpkin pie uses only a small amount of oil in the crust and skim milk in the filling to m...
Varicose Veins: Not Just an Older Woman’s Problem
11/13/14 8:13 a.m.
You might think of varicose veins as an older woman’s problem, but it may actually have more to do with your li...