Marymount Hospital

Vascular Surgery Suite

Cleveland Clinic vascular surgeons choose our newly opened, advanced endovascular suite to perform minimally invasive procedures for aneurysms, carotid arteries and stents. They specialize in the diagnosis and management of:

  • Carotid artery disease
  • Aortic aneurysms
  • Poor circulation to the legs and the abdominal organs
  • Comprehensive services for all types of peripheral vascular disorders

Advanced Vascular Technology

Marymount is the first community hospital in northeast Ohio with advanced vascular technology to help diagnose and treat vascular disease, using a new multi-axis angiography system which features robotic technology that allows for greater ease in positioning patients, as well as visualization of larger sections of the anatomy. It is the same angiography system used at Cleveland Clinic.

Angiography Uses

Angiography is a procedure that helps physicians visualize blood vessels in the body, including the heart, brain and kidneys, to determine if there is narrowing or blockage. Angiography also makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure, as in patients who undergo surgery, angioplasty or stent placement.

  • Multi-axis angiography system with robotic technology for positioning patients
  • Spacious new vascular suite, dedicated exclusively to vascular procedures

For more information or to make an appointment, call 216.587.4280.

Traditional Open Surgery for Aneurysms»

Traditional open surgery as a treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms and other types of aneurysm includes a long incision to gain access to and repair the aneurysm. The best method to repair an aneurysm depends upon several factors, including the location and shape of the aneurysm as well as the physical condition of the patient.

Each patient is evaluated, and treatment will be individualized for the patient's circumstances. Our Cleveland Clinic physicians are recognized internationally for their extensive experience with surgical approaches for treating aneurysms.

Endovascular Grafting for Aneurysms (Minimally Invasive Repair)»

Endovascular grafting is the minimally invasive method of aortic aneurysm treatment. Instead of an open aneurysm repair, your surgeon may consider a newer procedure called an Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR, TEVAR, TA-EVAR). Endovascular surgery is performed inside your aorta using thin, long tubes called catheters to place a stent surrounded with a fabric liner to reinforce the weak spots.

You may be eligible for endovascular stent grafting if your aneurysm has not ruptured and the aneurysm is 5 centimeters or more in size. The best method to repair an aneurysm depends upon several factors, including the location and shape of the aneurysm as well as the physical condition of the patient. Each patient is evaluated, and treatment will be individualized for the patient's circumstances.

Bypass for Atherosclerosis/PAD/PVD»

Also called Lower Extremity Bypass surgery, this surgical procedure reroutes blood flow around a blocked blood vessel by creating a new pathway for blood flow using a graft. You may need this procedure if your arteries become too narrowed or blocked from plaque inside the artery walls. If arteries are blocked, blood cannot get through to nourish the tissues, causing the muscles of the lower extremities to cramp and lose strength. In severe cases, you may develop pain or develop ulcers on your feet.

Carotid Endarterectomy»

Carotid Endarterectomy is the surgical removal of plaque within the carotid artery (the artery that supplies blood to the brain), and is the most commonly performed surgical treatment for carotid artery disease. This procedure may be recommended for patients who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or a mild stroke due to significant carotid artery disease. For these individuals, carotid endarterectomy can be highly beneficial in preventing future strokes.

CEA may also be recommended if the carotid artery has severe narrowing or blockage. In this case, an individual is at risk for embolization, where debris in the area of narrowing can break off and head upstream into a blood vessel in the brain blocking the supply of oxygen to cells in the brain. To reduce this risk, CEA must be done to open the artery and allow blood flow to the brain. In such instances, a stroke could occur if the patient does not receive treatment for carotid artery disease.

Atherosclerosis Atherectomy»

An atherectomy is a procedure performed under local anesthesia that utilizes a catheter with a sharp blade on the end to remove plaque from a blood vessel. The catheter is inserted into the artery through a small puncture. It is designed to collect the removed plaque in a chamber in the tip, which allows removal of the plaque as the device is removed from the artery.

The process can be repeated at the time the treatment is performed to remove a significant amount of disease from the artery, thus eliminating a blockage from atherosclerotic disease. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the build-up of plaque in your arteries. You may need this atherectomy procedure if your arteries become too narrowed or blocked from plaque inside the artery walls.

If arteries are blocked, blood cannot get through to nourish the tissues, causing the muscles of the lower extremities to cramp and lose strength. An atherectomy is especially helpful for treating blockages in arteries that occur around branches or in vessels that are not easily treated with stents.

Atherosclerosis Endarterectomy»

An atherosclerosis endarterectomy is the open surgical removal of plaque from a blood vessel. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the build-up of plaque in your arteries. You may need this atherosclerosis endarterectomy procedure if your arteries become too narrowed or blocked from plaque inside the artery walls. If arteries are blocked, blood cannot get through to nourish the tissues, causing the muscles of the lower extremities to cramp and lose strength. In severe cases, you may experience pain at rest or develop ulcers on your feet.

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