Radiation Oncology Residency

Cancer Answer Line: 866.223.8100

Cancer Answer Line:

866.223.8100

Our fully accredited training program offers a five year residency, which begins with a transitional year sponsored by the Department of Radiation Oncology. The remaining four years are spent training in radiation oncology. Medical student electives are also available at Cleveland Clinic.

This superior academic and clinical training program is equipped with the latest radiotherapy and radiosurgery technology and designed to prepare our residents to become future leaders in the practice of radiation oncology.

Cleveland Clinic is a large tertiary care medical center. Accordingly, there is ample clinical experience for residents in training. Residents are exposed to a variety of malignancies and treatments during their training. The department has 2 CT simulators, along with 6 linear accelerators treating up to 150 patients per day.

Experience in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), Gamma Knife Radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy (lung, spine, liver, prostate), permanent prostate seed brachytherapy (~7-8 cases/week), total body irradiation, high dose rate brachytherapy, hyperthermia, radioimmunotherapy, and intraoperative radiation are an integral part of Cleveland Clinic's program.

Pediatric experience is gained throughout training and during a dedicated month rotation at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital during the PGY-4 or 5 year.

Curriculum


PGY 1 (Transitional year)

Internal Medicine 2 months
Hematology / Oncology 2 months
Urology 1 month
Subspecialty Oncology Clinic 1 month
Otolaryngology 1 month
Radiology / Pathology 1 month
Gynecologic Oncology 1 month
Breast Surgery 1 month
Palliative Medicine 1 month
Emergency Medicine 1 month

Applicants matching to Cleveland Clinic's Radiation Oncology Residency Program are required to complete their first year of residency at Cleveland Clinic. A unique transitional year has been created by the department to expose new residents to a dynamic mix of surgical and medical rotations, with an emphasis on the management of patients with cancer. As an intern, you will meet and work closely with many of the same surgeons and oncologists that you will continue to work with throughout the remainder of your specialty training.

Orientation at Cleveland Clinic for all incoming residents and interns begins in the last week of June, and full clinical duties begin July 1st.

PGY 2-PGY 5 (Radiation Oncology)

PGY 2

During the PGY-2 year, new resident are immersed in introductory physics and radio-biology course work in addition to exposure to the fundamentals of radiation oncology. Areas covered include work-up, treatment planning process, delivery of radiation and follow up of patients receiving radiotherapy.

PGY 3

During the PGY-3 year, the residents are expected to improve their understanding of all aspects of radiation oncology, especially the treatment planning process, and also to develop a research interest for the following year.

PGY 4

During the PGY-4 year, residents are expected to perform clinical or basic science research for six to nine months under the supervision of an appropriate Cleveland Clinic faculty member. The remaining time will be spent in electives such as dosimetry and community radiation oncology. One member of the PGY-4 class is selected by the faculty to serve as Chief Resident.

PGY 5

During the PGY-5 year, the level of responsibility is increased. The year is structured to consolidate clinical skills and the knowledge base acquired during the previous three years.

Teaching Conferences

Resident teaching conferences are held daily between 8:00-9:00 am and are staffed by radiation oncology attending physicians and medical physicists. Residents are exempt from clinical duties during these times.

Morning Conference

Case presentation and discussion of a specific disease site, twice per week. Residents and staff discuss anatomy, work-up, imaging, treatment options, and field design. Residents are expected to study and a handout is distributed at the conclusion of the meeting.

Chart Rounds

A conference to discuss the set-up, planning, and techniques of radiation delivery.

Physics and Radiation Biology Lectures

Weekly interactive lectures in physics and radiation biology are given by faculty members for residents in the PGY-2 to PGY-4 years.

Journal Club

Monthly meetings to discuss recent articles in the field.

Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds

Bi-weekly lunch time educational sessions, conferences led by faculty members or residents.

Tumor Board

Regularly scheduled multidisciplinary conferences, attended by medical oncology, surgery, and radiation oncology in the areas of lung, breast, CNS, head & neck, gynecology, gastroenterology, and lymphoma.

Visiting Professor Program

At least four times per year, leaders in radiation oncology are invited to spend a day at Cleveland Clinic. Usually, the invited professor will give a lecture and then spend the morning discussing specific cases or issues in radiation oncology with residents.

Research & Meetings

Resident research activity can begin early at Cleveland Clinic. Although there is a dedicated 6-9 months of research time in the PGY-4 year, many junior residents have oral or poster presentations at national meetings such as ASTRO, ASCO, RSNA, AUA, and SNO.

Cleveland Clinic allows residents to attend a meeting of their choice starting in the PGY-2 year. All residents in their PGY-3, 4, and 5 year typically attend ASTRO.

Additional funding is available within the department for residents who present research at other national meetings.

Benefits

  • Vacation: 15 days (3 weeks) per year + variable number of meeting days and institutional holidays
  • Call Schedule: Home call, one week at a time.
  • Book fund: An individual book fund is available for all residents to purchase texts.
  • Office space: Each resident has personal desk space with a computer and dual monitors. The residents' room is on the 2nd floor (windows!).
  • Pagers: Cleveland Clinic has a text paging system.
Applications are accepted between September 1 - October 15

There are typically three positions available per year (in the 2014 match, only two positions are available). Cleveland Clinic and the Radiation Oncology Program participate in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) for the application process and the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) for the matching of residents to programs.

The internship year is incorporated into the residency program at CCF. Therefore, applicants who match at Cleveland Clinic for residency will also match at CCF for their internship.

Interviews

Applications will be reviewed upon completion and selected candidates will be invited for interviews. Candidates selected for interviews will be notified in November and interviews will typically occur on Mondays in January. The interview schedule begins with an informal evening with the residents at a local restaurant. This is an opportunity for the applicants to get to know the residents and ask questions.

Each candidate is provided with an individualized timetable for their interview day (typically Monday). For all candidates, this includes a program overview over breakfast with the program director at approximately 7:30 am, morning conference beginning at 8:00 am, after which applicants interview with various members of the department. Each candidate will meet with 6-9 faculty members on interview day, including the Chairman, the Program Director, and the Chief Medical Physicist. Interviewees are also given an opportunity to spend some time in the clinic. Prior to completing their final interviews, applicants have another chance to get to know the residents during the informal interview day lunch. The day typically concludes around 2:00 pm, although schedules may vary.

Note

Cleveland Clinic subsidizes a proportion of accommodation fees.

Elective Medical Student Rotations

Fourth year medical students interested in an elective rotation in the Department of Radiation Oncology should contact Danielle Berry regarding availability at berryd2@ccf.org or by phone at 216-445-4379.

Further information about medical student elective rotations at Cleveland Clinic, including requirements, eligibility and the application form can be viewed at the Cleveland Clinic Medical Student Elective Website.

Students who perform electives at Cleveland Clinic are often expected to function as independent residents. Responsibilities include evaluation of patients, dictation, and presentation of a morning conference. Both research and clinical electives are available.

Contact Information

You may obtain additional information about the Radiation Oncology Residency Program by contacting:

Danielle Berry

Department of Radiation Oncology
Cleveland Clinic
9500 Euclid Avenue T-28
Cleveland, OH 44195
Phone: 216.445.4379
Email: berryd2@ccf.org

PGY-5

Monica Shukla, MD

Hometown: Hamburg, NY

Medical School: Vanderbilt Medical School

Hobbies: Spending time with friends and family, traveling, taking walks around Shaker Lakes, anything outdoors, cooking, entertaining, dance parties

Why Cleveland Clinic? Excellent, organized educational program, attendings that are strongly invested in resident education, integrated intern year that allows you to build relationships with people outside of the Rad/Onc department (other residents/fellows, attendings, nurses) and funny, intelligent & caring co-residents

Aryavarta Kumar, MD, PhD

Hometown: Kuwait, London, Philly, Cleveland (been here for 10+ years)

Medical School: Case Western Reserve University

Hobbies: Music, music composition, movies, technology, entreprenuership

PGY-4

Gaurav Marwaha, MD (Chief Resident)

Hometown: Cleveland

Medical School: University of Cincinnati

Hobbies: Exploring Cleveland's Metroparks and Ohio's North Coast, Browns/Indians/Cavs, Bhangra, acoustic guitar, surfing, hoops, tennis, hanging out with my co-residents

Why Cleveland Clinic? The family-like feel to our residency, I can't imagine a better teaching program, the incredible diversity of colleagues and patients alike that this institution attracts from all over the world

Jason Hearn, MD

Hometown: Portland, OR

Medical School: Harvard Medical School

Hobbies: Hiking Cleveland's gorgeous Metroparks, camping on Lake Erie's islands, catching a Broadway show at Playhouse Square, enjoying architecture and cuisine in Tremont, playing Euro board games in Akron, photographing nature, reading Lovecraft, exploring The Savage Coast, and geocaching


Mihir Naik, DO

Hometown: Cerritos, CA

Medical School: Midwestern University

Hobbies: Traveling, photography, reading, TV, stand up comedy

PGY-3

Neil Woody, MD

Hometown: Toronto, Canada

Medical School: Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

Hobbies: Hiking, canoeing, hockey

Why Cleveland Clinic? The dedicated intern year is structured to allow rotations through radiation related specialties and get to know the clinic and referring physicians. There are dedicated conferences for resident education daily. The mentorship model working directly one on one with a single staff member at a time who is passionate about resident education. Co-residents who are friendly, fun and motivated to add to each other’s learning.


Mike Weller, MD

Hometown: Orlando, FL

Medical School: University of Miami School of Medicine

Hobbies: I'm an ACC sports fan marooned Big 10 country. I love to travel, spend too much money at restaurants, and watch way too many movies and TV shows. Most importantly, I love spending time hanging out with my wife and playing with our dog.

Why Cleveland? Cleveland has great, affordable housing and a fantastic park system. It's an excellent food and beer town with diverse local cuisine (Michael Symon's restaurants, Little Italy, AsiaTown, etc.) In my neighborhood alone, my wife and I can walk to an independent movie theater, a brewery, a local wine and beer shop, and a probably a dozen restaurants, most of which have patios to take advantage of the great summer weather. But some of my favorite times have been grilling out in our backyard with good friends and family.

Why Cleveland Clinic? Aside from all of the benefits associated with training in a world class hospital and cancer center, I believe our faculty's uncompromised dedication to resident teaching is truly unique.


Jeff Kittel, MD

Hometown: Wilton, CT

Medical School: Washington University in St. Louis

Hobbies: Baseball, Cleveland's amazing microbrewery scene, the West Side Market, biking

Why Cleveland Clinic? The family-like relationship among the residents, our excellent educational curriculum, and the chance to learn from amazing teachers


Steven Oh, MD

Hometown: Portland, OR

Medical School: Yale

Hobbies: Boxing, Snowboarding, Surfing, Tennis, Traveling

PGY-2

Yvonne Thanh-Nga Pham, MD

Hometown: Orange County, CA

Medical School: University of California at Davis- Sacramento, CA

Hobbies: Beginner golfer. I also enjoy tennis, running, traveling and photography.

Why Cleveland Clinic? The specialty tailored intern year at Cleveland Clinic gives you great hands-on experience with the medical and surgical fields related to radiation oncology. You have a chance to assist with relevant oncologic surgeries and follow patients in their post-op recovery. On the Heme/Onc and palliative rotations, you learn about pain management and how to care for patients in the context of their cancer. The breadth of exposure to these related fields has been invaluable to my training


Matt Ward, MD

Hometown: Alpharetta, GA

Medical School: Medical College of Georgia

Hobbies: Getting Rupesh all worked up about nothing, traveling, reading, camping, whitewater, snowboarding, hanging out with my wife


Rupesh Kotecha, MD

Hometown: Midland, MI

Medical School: MSU College of Human Medicine

Hobbies: Spending more time at Cheesecake Factory than at the hospital, Playhouse Square, Cleveland Orchestra

PGY-1

Ehsan Balagamwala, MD

Hometown: St. Louis, MO

Medical School: Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

Hobbies: Photography, traveling, basketball


Camille Berriochoa, MD

Hometown: Boise, ID

Medical School: University of Washington

Hobbies: Running, mountain biking, hiking, skiing, traveling, learning Spanish, salsa dancing, reading, cooking, hosting dinner parties, baking


Charles Mark Leyrer, MD

Hometown: Cary, NC

Medical School: Wake Forest

Hobbies: Reading, snowboarding, board games, home-brewing, racquetball, movies

Publications 2012-2013

Papers in Peer-Reviewed Journals
  1. Chao ST, Ahluwalia MS, Barnett GH, Stevens, GH, Murphy ES, Stockham AL, Shiue K, Suh JH. Challenges with the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, accepted for publication.
  2. Guo S, Reddy CA, Kolar M, Woody N, Mahadevan A, Deibel FC, Dietz DW, Remzi FH, Suh JH. Intraoperative radiation therapy with the photon radiosurgery system in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer: retrospective review of the Cleveland clinic experience. Radiat Oncol. 2012 Jul 20;7:110.
  3. Guo S, Reddy CA, Chao ST, Suh JH, Barnett GH, Vogelbaum MA, Videtic GM. Impact of non-small cell lung cancer histology on survival predicted from the graded prognostic assessment for patients with brain metastases. Lung Cancer. 2012 Aug;77(2):389-93.
  4. Kumar A, Bui C, Nasta S, Schuster SJ, Plastaras JP. Case Series: Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy to Treat Limited Stage Non-Endemic Nasal Natural Killer/T Cell Lymphoma. Int J Hematol. 2012; 8 (1), e-published.
  5. Kumar SS, Stockham AL, Chao ST, Ahluwalia M, Suh JH. Radiation necrosis: Now you see it, now you don’t. Applied Radiat Oncol. 2013 February: 24-27.
  6. Marwaha G, Wilkinson A, Bena J, Macklis R, Singh A. Dosimetric Benefit of a New Ophthalmic Radiation Plaque. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2012 Dec 1; 84 (5) : 1226-1230.
  7. Shukla ME, Kumar AMS, Godley A, Khuntia D. Imaging and radiation therapy: Current trends and future possibilities. Applied Radiat Oncol, February 2013.
  8. Stockham AL, Tievsky AL, Koyfman SA, Reddy CA, Suh JH, Vogelbaum MA, Barnett GH, Chao ST. Standard MRI Findings Do Not Reliably Distinguish Radiation Necrosis from Tumor Recurrence. J Neurooncol. 2012 Aug;109(1): 149-58.
  9. Stockham AL, Suh J, Chao S. Difficult Cases: Management of Recurrent Brain Metastasis after Radiosurgery. In: Kim, Dong Gyu and Lunsford, L Dade. Currentand Future Management of Brain Metastasis, A Volume in 'Progress in Neurological Surgery'. Prog Neurol Surg. 2012; 25: 273-86.
  10. Stockham AL, Chao ST, Suh JH. Wanted Dead or Alive? Distinguishing radiationnecrosis from tumor progression after stereotactic radiosurgery. Applied Radiat Oncol. 2012; (1):26-29.
  11. Tendulkar RD, Rehman S, Shukla ME, Reddy CA, Moore HC, Budd GT, Dietz J, Crowe JP, Macklis R. Impact of Post-mastectomy Radiation on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Modern Systemic Therapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2012; 83(5): e577–e581.
Book Chapters
  1. Chao S, Marwaha G. CNS Malignancies. In: Suh, J. Radiation Oncology Self-Assessment Guide: A Question & Answer Review. New York, NY: Demos Medical; 2012: 53-118.
  2. Koyfman, SK, Shukla ME. Head and Neck Cancers. In: Suh, J. Radiation Oncology Self-Assessment Guide. New York, NY: Demos Medical; 2012: 3-47.
  3. Murphy E, Guo S, Marwaha G. Pediatric Malignancies. In: Suh, J. Radiation Oncology Self-Assessment Guide: A Question & Answer Review. New York, NY: Demos Medical; 2012: 497-552.
  4. Stephans KL, Kumar A. Genitourinary Cancers. In: Suh, J. Radiation Oncology Self-Assessment Guide. NY: Demos Medical; 2012: 305-60.

Resident Presentations 2012-2013»

Presentations
  1. Abdel-Wahab M, Yu C, Fredman ET, Kumar AMS, El-Gazzaz G, Aucejo FN, Coppa C, Kattan M. Prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after primary treatment using nomograms. Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 55th Annual Meeting; September 22-25, 2013; Atlanta, GA.
  2. Guo S, Reddy CA, Stephans KL, Videtic GM. Outcomes of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Risk NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer Patients and Validation of RTOG 0213. Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting; October 28-31, 2012; Boston, MA.
  3. Hearn J, Videtic GMM, Djemil T, and Stephans KL. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Local Failure after Upfront Lung SBRT: If at First You Don't Succeed... Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting; October 28-31, 2012; Boston, MA.
  4. Hearn J, Reddy CA, Weller MA, Kotecha RR, Marwaha G, Ciezki JP, Stephans KL, and Tendulkar RD. Prostate Cancer in the Era of High-Dose Radiotherapy: Presence of Multiple Intermediate-Risk Factors is Not a Valid Surrogate for High-Risk Disease. Poster Discussion at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 55th Annual Meeting; September 22-25, 2013; Atlanta, GA.
  5. Kittel J, Reddy C, Ulchaker J, Angermeier K, Stephans KL, Tendulkar R, Chehade N, Altman A, Klein E, Ciezki JP. A Significant Cause of Variability in Prostate Brachytherapy Outcomes as Demonstrated from a Single Institution Suggesting a Method for Uniform Reporting among Institutions. Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 55th Annual Meeting; September 22-25, 2013; Atlanta, GA.
  6. Kumar AMS, Falk G, Stephans KL, Walsh M, Pelley , Abdel-Wahab M. Influence of Adjuvant Treatment on Outcomes in Resectable Pancreatic Cancer. ASTRO 2013; September 22-25, 2013; Atlanta, GA.
  7. Kumar AMS, El-Gazzaz G, Aucejo F, Abdel-Wahab M. Outcomes of Liver Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients: A Cleveland Clinic Experience. Poster Discussion at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting; October 28-31, 2012; Boston, MA.
  8. Kumar AMS, Mehta A, Kiran R, Kalady M, Lavery I, Abdel-Wahab M. Peri-operative Complications in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease who Received Chemoradiation for Colorectal Malignancy. Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting; October 28-31, 2012; Boston, MA.
  9. Kumar AMS, Bledsoe T, Noble A, Shang Q, Saxton JP, Rodriguez CP, Adelstein DJ, Koyfman SA, Xia P, Greskovich JF. A Dosimetric Analysis of 3D vs. IMRT Planning and its Impact on Acute Grade 3 Dysphagia and Xerostomia in Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients Treated with Chemoradiotherapy. Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting; October 28-31, 2012; Boston, MA.
  10. Kumar AMS, Videtic GMM, Woody N, Djemil T, Stephans KL. Synchronous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Nodules Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). Presented at the Multidisciplinary Thoracic Oncology Symposium 2012; September 6-8, 2012; Chicago, IL.
  11. Kumar A, Woody NM, Djemil T, Videtic GMM, Stephans KL. Presented at American Radium Society 2013; May 1, 2013; Scottsdale, AZ.
  12. Marwaha G, Reddy C, Stephans KL, Videtic GM. Lung lesions treated with SBRT: Does size matter? Presented at 2012 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology; September 6, 2012; Chicago, IL.
  13. Marwaha G, Reddy C, Stephans KL, Videtic GM. Lung lesions treated with SBRT: Does size matter? Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting; October 28-31, 2012; Boston, MA.
  14. Marwaha G, Reddy C, Weller M, Kotecha R, Hearn JWD, Ciezki JP, Stephans KL, Tendulkar R. Gleason Pattern 5: Is Adverse Really Worse? Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 55th Annual Meeting; September 22-25, 2013; Atlanta, GA.
  15. Oh S, Gales JM, Reddy CA, Murphy ES, Yu JS, Suh JH, Chao SC. Reirradiation of Gliomas. Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 55th Annual Meeting; September 22-25, 2013; Atlanta, GA.
  16. Shukla ME, Reddy C, Yu C, Abdel-Wahab M, Stephans KL, Tendulkar RD. Redefining Stage IV Prostate Cancer - Is There a Subset Who May be Cured? Oral Presentation at the 55th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO); September 25, 2013, Atlanta, GA
  17. Shukla ME, Rehman S, Reddy CA, Macklis R, Budd GT, Moore HC, Crowe JP, Dietz J, Tendulkar RD. Influence of Receptor Status and Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on Outcomes of Patients Treated with Mastectomy for Invasive Breast Cancer. Presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO); September 23, 2013; Atlanta, GA
  18. Shukla ME, Mir MC, Stephenson AJ, Stephans KL, Klein EA, Tendulkar RD. Pre-radiotherapy PSA Is Predictive Of Biochemical Progression Free Survival Following Post-prostatectomy Salvage Radiotherapy. Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting; October 28-31, 2012; Boston, MA.
  19. Song A, Kumar AMS, Murphy ES, Tekautz T, Suh JH, Recinos V, Chao ST. Adult Medulloblastoma: Survival, Recurrence, and Prognostic Factors. Society or Neurological Oncology 2013; November 21-24, 2013; San Francisco, CA.
  20. Weller M, Kupelian P, Reddy C, Kotecha R, Ciezki J, Klein E, Stephans K, Tendulkar R. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Long Term Outcomes and a Comparison to Standard Dose-Escalated RT. Poster Discussion at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 55th Annual Meeting; September 22-25, 2013; Atlanta, GA.
  21. Weller M, Tendulkar R, Reddy C, Stephans R, Kupelian P. Adjuvant vs. Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation with Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Does Sequencing Matter? Presented at the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium; February 14-16, 2013; Orlando, FL.
  22. Videtic G, Reddy C, Marwaha G, Woody N, Djemil T, Stephans K. Mature Experience in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early Stage Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer at Cleveland Clinic. Presented at the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting; October 28-31, 2012; Boston, MA.
Lectures
  1. Shukla ME. Radiation-Induced Liver Disease. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. December 21, 2012.
  2. Kumar A. Dysphagia. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. October 26, 2012.
  3. Marwaha G. Androgen Deprivation Therapy. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. September 21, 2012.
  4. Guo S. Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes from Repeat Whole Brain Irradiation. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. September 7, 2012.
  5. Hearn J. Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. April 19, 2013.
  6. Kittel J. Radiation Myelopathy. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. April 5, 2013.
  7. Stockham. Radionecrosis of the Brain. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. August 17, 2012.
  8. Weller M. Radiation Dermatitis. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. November 16, 2012.
  9. Woody N. Radiation-induced Heart Disease. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. April 26, 2013.
  10. Oh S. Radiation Pneumonitis. Radiation Oncology Grand Rounds. Cleveland Clinic; Cleveland, OH. March 16, 2013.

Recent Graduates from the Radiation Oncology Residency Program»

Former Resident Medical School Current Position
Susan Guo, MD (2013) Columbia University, New York, NC Albuquerque, NM
Abigail Stockham, MD (2013) University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Harvard University, Boston, MA
Grant Hunter, MD (2012) University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT
Lawrence Sheplan, MD (2012) University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico San Juan, Puerto Rico
Shlomo Koyfman, MD (2011) Yale University, New Haven, CT Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
Mohammad Khan, MD, PhD (2011) University of Tennesse, Memphis, TN Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA
Michael Burdick, MD (2010) Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Parma Hospital, Parma, OH
Erin Murphy, MD (2010) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
Andrew Vassil, MD (2010) University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
Clifford Robinson, MD (2009) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Kevin Stephans, MD (2009) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
Carryn Anderson, MD (2008) U. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Rahul Tendulkar, MD (2008) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
Heath Mackley, MD (2007) University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA
Justin Juliano, MD (2007) SUNY Upstate, Syracuse, NY Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA
Samuel Chao, MD (2006) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
Vipul Thakkar, MD (2006) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Southeast Radiation Oncology Group, Charlotte, NC
Ratna Sajja, MD (2005) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Cancer Care Associates, McKinney, TX
Aimee Quan, MD (2005) University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH Kaiser / Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA
Tom Carlson, MD (2004) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ Wenatchee Valley Medical Center, Wenatchee, WA
Deepak Khuntia, MD (2004) University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA
Chandrika Patel, MD (2003) Washington University, St. Louis, MO St. John Cancer Center, Anderson, IN
Mohammad El Shaikh, MD (2003) Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI
Jeffrey Buchsbaum, MD, PhD. (2002) Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Indiana University Midwest Proton Center, Indianapolis, IN
Jason Seavolt, MD (2002) Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH Riverside Methodist Medical Center, Columbus, OH
Teresa Davies-Johns, MD (2001) NE Ohio Univ. College of Medicine, Rootstown, OH  
Lav Goyal, MD (2001) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Associates in Radiation Oncology, Parkland, FL
Mark Chidel, MD (2000) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Summit Radiation Oncology, Littleton, CO
Janice Lyons, MD (2000) Chicago Medical School, Chicago, IL University Hospitals Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH

Resident Awards and Committees»

Cleveland Area Attractions


The Cleveland Museum of Art

Newly renovated, The Cleveland Museum of Art features more than 46,000 pieces and work-in-progress galleries.


The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

The greatest stories and biggest names in rock and roll shine on at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, featuring 4 theaters, multiple interactive stations and seven floors of exhibits.

The Cleveland Metroparks

Get active and live the outdoor life at the Cleveland Metroparks. Explore over 22,000 acres in 18 reservations.

The Cleveland Orchestra

The Cleveland Orchestra is considered one of the nation's best. See a concert at their winter home, Severance Hall, or during summer, listen alfresco at Blossom Music Center.

The Cleveland Sports Scene

Catch an Indians, Cavs, or Browns game- just minutes from Cleveland Clinic!

East 4th Street

From the best food and entertainment the city has to offer to the coolest address in town to live, East 4th Street is an experience you do not want to miss!

Ohio City

Ohio City is considered one of the most diverse and desirable places to live, work, study, play, and worship.

Playhouse Square

The largest performance arts center in the nation outside of New York hosts operas, ballets, concerts and Broadway-style musicals.

The West Side Market

Catch a glimpse of Cleveland's melting pot heritage at this bustling indoor market where vendors sell fruits, veggies, baked goods and more.

Cancer Answers & Appointments

Speak with a cancer nurse specialist for appointment assistance and for answers to your questions about cancer locally at 216.444.7923 or toll-free 1.866.223.8100.

Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (ET).

Referrals

Resources for medical professionals

  • Outpatient appointment referrals: 216.444.7923 or 866.223.8100
  • Inpatient hospital transfers: 800.553.5056
  • Referring Physician Concierge: 216.444.6196 or 216.312.4910.

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