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Ashtabula County Medical Center

The Quality Performance Report shows how Ashtabula County Medical Center has been doing at providing the right care for certain common conditions and preventing certain types of infections.

What is a heart attack?

A heart attack (also called AMI or acute myocardial infarction) happens when the arteries leading to the heart become blocked and the blood supply is slowed or stopped. When the heart muscle can’t get the oxygen it needs, the part of the heart tissue that is affected may die.

The symptoms of a heart attack can include:

  • Chest pain (often described as a crushing, squeezing or burning pain in the center of the chest and may radiate to your arm or jaw)
  • Shortness of breath
  • Dizziness or faintness
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • Cold or clammy skin
  • A gray or very ill appearance

Sometimes there may be no symptoms, especially if you have diabetes. Women sometimes have different symptoms, such as a different kind of chest pain and/or abdominal pain.

For more information about heart health go to:

View other publicly reported data about heart attack care in hospitals:

Why Heart Failure Care Measures are Important

Heart failure is a weakening of the heart's pumping power. With heart failure, your body doesn't get enough oxygen and nutrients to meet its needs. Your heart tries to pump more blood, but the muscle walls become weaker over time. These measures show some of the standards of care provided for most adults with heart failure.

Symptoms of heart failure may include:

  • shortness of breath from fluid in the lungs
  • swelling (such as in legs, ankles or abdomen)
  • dizziness
  • fatigue
  • weakness
  • cold or clammy skin
  • a rapid or irregular heartbeat

Heart failure can be a result of heart condition due to:

  • hardening of the arteries, also known as coronary artery disease a heart attack
  • cardiomyopathy (heart muscle damage from infection or alcohol or drug abuse)
  • an overworked heart (caused over time by conditions like high blood pressure, kidney disease, diabetes, or a defect from birth)

For more information about heart health go to:

View other publicly reported data about heart failure care in hospitals:

How is Ashtabula County Medical Center performing on heart failure care?

This score tells you the percent of heart failure patients who got all the recommended care appropriate for them from the list below:

  1. left ventricular systolic (LVS) function was evaluated before hospital arrival, during hospitalization, or scheduled for after discharge
  2. angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor medication or an angiotensin receptor-blocker (ARB) medication was prescribed at discharge from the hospital (applies only to patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, also called LVSD)
  3. received written instructions or educational material about heart failure before discharge from the hospital

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job is to look at the percent of heart failure patients who got all the recommended care on the list (as appropriate for each individual).

Higher numbers are better.

Ashtabula County Medical Center (October 2013 - December 2013) 100%
U.S. Hospitals (July 2013 - September 2013)    95%

Update: June 2014

Heart Failure Patient Mortality (Death)

This score tells you about the percent (rate) of heart failure patients that died within 30 days of going into the hospital.

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job is to see if the death (mortality) rate for heart failure patients treated at that hospital is better than, the same as or worse than the U.S. national average. The death rates take into account how sick patients were before they were admitted to the hospital.

Lower numbers are better.

How is Ashtabula County Medical Center doing with heart failure patient deaths?
July 2009 – June 2012
Ashtabula County Medical Center 9.6%
U.S. national average 11.7%

The heart failure death rate shown for Ashtabula County Medical Center is lower (better) than the national average, but that difference is not significant. This means that Ashtabula County Medical Center's rate is basically the same as the national average.

Only regular Medicare patients are included. People in Medicare Advantage (managed care plans) and people who do not have Medicare are not included.

Updated: May 2013

Heart Failure Patient Hospital Readmission

This score tells you about the percent (rate) of hospitalized heart failure patients who go back into a hospital again within 30 days after going home. Patients may have been readmitted back to the same hospital or to a different hospital. They may have been readmitted for heart failure-related care or for a different reason.

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job is to see if the readmission rate for heart failure patients is better than, the same as or worse than the U.S. national average. The readmission rates take into account how sick patients were before they were admitted to the hospital.

Lower numbers are better.

How is Ashtabula County Medical Center doing with heart failure patient hospital readmission?
July 2009 – June 2012
Ashtabula County Medical Center 22.3%
U.S. national average 23.0%

Ashtabula County Medical Center's readmission rate is lower (better) than the national average, but that difference is not significant. This means that Ashtabula County Medical Center’s rate is basically the same as the national average.

Only regular Medicare patients are included. People in Medicare Advantage (managed care plans) and people who do not have Medicare are not included.

Updated: July 2013

How is Ashtabula County Medical Center performing on stroke care?

This score tells you the the hospital's overall performance on the stroke care items listed below:

  1. medication or other treatment was given to prevent blood clots in veins
  2. an antithrombotic medication such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix®) or aspirin combined with dipyridamole (Aggrenox®) was given by end of hospital day two
  3. an anticoagulant medication such as warfarin (Coumadin®) was prescribed at discharge from the hospital (applies only to patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter)
  4. a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) medication (sometimes called a “clot buster”) was given within 3 hours of start of stroke symptoms (applies only to patients who arrived at the hospital within two hours of start of stroke symptoms)
  5. a cholesterol lowering medication (called a “statin” medication) was prescribed at discharge, (applies only to patients with an LDL or “bad” cholesterol level greater than 100 or who were on a cholesterol lowering medication prior to hospitalization)
  6. advice and stroke education material were provided before discharge from the hospital
  7. an antithrombotic medication such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix®) or aspirin combined with dipyridamole (Aggrenox®) was prescribed at discharge from the hospital
  8. patients were assessed for rehabilitation services

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job taking care of stroke patients is to look at how consistently the hospital provides the care listed above.

Higher percentage is better.

acmc-stroke-overall.jpg

Q = Quarter. Example: January – March

* National stroke program percentage is the most current available for all hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With the Guidelines ® (GWTG) stroke program. Please note: “This Get With the Guidelines (GWTG) Aggregate Data report was generated using the Outcome PMT system. Copy or distribution of the GWTG Aggregate Data is prohibited without the prior written consent of the American Heart Association and Outcome Sciences, Inc. (Outcome).”

+ Ashtabula County Medical Center's results for the most recent quarter may change slightly if additional data become available.

Updated: June 2014

For more information about brain health, go to:

View other publicly reported data about stroke care in hospitals:

Pneumonia Patient Hospital Readmission

This score tells you about the percent (rate) of hospitalized pneumonia patients who go back into a hospital again within 30 days after going home. Patients may have been readmitted back to the same hospital or to a different hospital. They may have been readmitted for pneumonia-related care or for a different reason.

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job is to see if the readmission rate for pneumonia patients is better than, the same as or worse than the U.S. national average. The readmission rates take into account how sick patients were before they were admitted to the hospital.

Lower numbers are better.

How is Ashtabula County Medical Center doing with pneumonia patient hospital readmission?
July 2009 – June 2012
Ashtabula County Medical Center 15.7%
U.S. national average 17.6%

Ashtabula County Medical Center's readmission rate is lower (better) than the national average, but that difference is not significant. This means that Ashtabula County Medical Center’s rate is basically the same as the national average.

Only regular Medicare patients are included. People in Medicare Advantage (managed care plans) and people who do not have Medicare are not included.

Updated: July 2013

Why Surgical Care Measures are Important

Hospitals can improve surgical care and reduce the risk of wound infection after surgery by making sure they provide care that’s known to get the best results for most patients.

There are also steps that you, as a patient, can take to make sure the surgery is as safe as possible. For example, your doctor or nurse can tell you how to wash with an antibiotic soap the day before surgery. You can also give your doctor or nurse a list of all your medications, including vitamins, herbal medicines and over-the-counter medications. You should also tell your doctor or nurse about any allergies and bad reactions to anesthesia. Sometimes patients get an infection after surgery, even if the hospital took steps to prevent it. Here are signs to look out for:

  • the surgical wound is red, hot, and swollen
  • you have a fever of over 100 degrees after you go home
  • a smelly or yellow/green fluid is coming out of the wound
  • your pain is increasing even though you are taking pain medication

Call your doctor or local hospital immediately if you have any of these signs.

View other publicly reported data about surgical care in hospitals:

These scores tell you about how often patients had certain serious, but potentially preventable complications (listed below) related to medical or surgical inpatient hospital care.

Where does the score come from? The information comes from documenting certain events in patient medical records. These events are then “coded” by the hospital for billing Medicare. Coded information is sometimes called “administrative” data.

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job is to look at how often patients experienced certain complications that might have been preventable.

Lower numbers are better.

How is Ashtabula County Medical Center doing with preventing certain serious complications?
October 2008 – June 2010

Rate per 1,000 Hospitalized Patients
Serious Complication U.S. National Average Ashtabula County Medical Center
Collapsed lung due to medical treatment 0.39 0.64*
Breathing failure after surgery 10.22 12.92*
Blood clot in the lung or large vein after surgery 5.89 4.14*
Wound that splits open after surgery 2.16 1.96*
Accidental cut or tear during surgery or other procedure 2.07 0.84*

Includes only people with “regular” Medicare. People in Medicare Advantage (managed care plans) and people who do not have Medicare are not included.

* The difference between Ashtabula County Medical Center and the national average is not significant. This means that Ashtabula County Medical Center’s rate is basically the same as the national average.

What is Ashtabula County Medical Center doing to improve?

Ashtabula County Medical Center has many initiatives underway to keep patients safe. Standard “best” practices are the key to success. Examples:

  • To prevent collapsed lungs due to medical treatment, Ashtabula County Medical Center implemented a standard procedure for placing and checking central lines (small tubes inserted and passed into a large vein or the heart).
  • To prevent blood clots in the lung or large vein after surgery, Ashtabula County Medical Center implemented a standard approach that includes checking each hospitalized patient’s risk for blood clots and providing medications or other treatment as indicated.
Keep in mind that you should not choose a hospital based solely on reported data.
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