Appointments

866.320.4573

Submit a Form

Questions

800.223.2273

Submit a Form

Expand Content

Ideas for Tomorrow

Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg

Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg

Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
6 p.m.
Bank of America Conference Center
InterContinental Hotel
9801 Carnegie Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44106

Register Now


Eric Schmidt served as Google’s CEO from 2001 to 2011. During that time he shepherded the company’s growth from a Silicon Valley start-up to a global technology leader that today has over $55 billion in annual revenues and offices in more than 40 countries. Eric is now Google’s executive chairman.

Jonathan Rosenberg joined Google in 2002 and managed the design and development of the company’s consumer, advertiser, and partner products, including Search, Ads, Gmail, Android, Apps, and Chrome. He is currently an advisor to Google CEO Larry Page.


#CCIdeas


With support from:

Cleveland Leadership Center

 

 

Upcoming "Ideas for Tomorrow" Speakers

Gentry Lee | Monday, October 13, 2014
Gentry Lee

Monday, October 13, 2014
5 p.m.
Bank of America Conference Center
InterContinental Hotel
9801 Carnegie Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44106

Register Now

Chief Engineer for the Solar System Exploration Directorate at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California

Gentry Lee is Chief Engineer for the Solar System Exploration Directorate at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. In that position Mr. Lee is responsible for the engineering integrity of all the robotic planetary missions managed by JPL for NASA. His major recent work includes the engineering oversight of the fantastically successful and popular Curiosity rover mission to Mars in August 2012, the Dawn mission to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres, the Juno mission to Jupiter, and the GRAIL missions to the Moon. Previously, Mr. Lee provided oversight for the Phoenix and twin MER rover missions to Mars, as well as the Deep Impact and Stardust missions.

Mr. Lee was Chief Engineer for the Galileo project from 1977-1988 and, after working in a variety of positions on the Viking project from 1968-76, was Director of Science Analysis and Mission Planning during the Viking operations. The historic Viking mission was mankind’s first successful surface mission on another planet. The Galileo mission explored Jupiter with both an atmospheric probe and an orbiter that mapped the major Jovian satellites during a decade of operations.

In addition to his engineering work, Gentry Lee has been an active novelist, television producer, computer game designer, media columnist, lecturer, and a television performer/narrator. Between 1989 and 1994 Mr. Lee co-authored four novels, CRADLE, RAMA II, THE GARDEN OF RAMA, and RAMA REVEALED, with revered science fiction grandmaster Arthur C. Clarke. All four books were New York Times bestsellers and were translated into over twenty-five languages. Since his collaboration with Mr. Clarke, Gentry Lee has written three more successful solo novels, BRIGHT MESSENGERS, DOUBLE FULL MOON NIGHT, and THE TRANQUILITY WARS.

Twitter

#CCIdeas

With support from:

NASA Cleveland Leadership CenterWashkewicz College of EngineeringCase School of Engineering

 

Thomas Friedman | Wednesday, November 5, 2014
Thomas Friedman

Thomas Friedman, a world-renowned author and journalist, has won the Pulitzer Prize three times for his work at The New York Times. His foreign affairs column, which appears twice a week, reports on US domestic politics and foreign policy, Middle East conflicts, international economics, environment, biodiversity and energy.

Friedman is the author of From Beirut to Jerusalem, which won both the National Book and the Overseas Press Club Awards in 1989, a revised edition was released in December 2012. The Lexus and the Olive Tree, winner of the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for best non-fiction book on foreign policy. Longitudes and Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11, issued in 2002, consists of columns Friedman published about September 11. The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century, issued in April 2005 and updated in 2006 and 2007, received the inaugural Goldman Sachs/Financial Times Business Book of the Year Award. In 2008 he brought out Hot, Flat, and Crowded, which was published in a revised edition a year later. His sixth book, That Used to Be Us: How American Fell Behind in the World We Invented and How We Can Come Back, co-written with Michael Mandelbaum, was released in 2011.

For his coverage of the Middle East, Mr. Friedman was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and 1988 for international reporting. He was awarded the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Commentary for “his clarity of vision…in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat.” In 2004, he was awarded the Overseas Press Club Award for lifetime achievement and the honorary title, Order of the British Empire (OBE), by Queen Elizabeth II.

Mr. Friedman lives in Bethesda, Maryland, with his wife, Ann.

Norman Foster | Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Norman Foster

Norman Foster was born in Manchester. After graduating from Manchester University School of Architecture and City Planning in 1961 he won a Henry Fellowship to Yale University, where he was a fellow of Jonathan Edwards College and gained a Master’s Degree in Architecture.

Established as Foster Associates in 1967 his practice, now known as Foster + Partners, is an international studio for architecture and design with projects on six continents. Over the past five decades the practice has pioneered a sustainable approach to architecture and ecology through a strikingly wide range of work, from urban masterplans and public infrastructure, to museums, airports, civic and cultural buildings, offices and workplaces to private houses and product design.

Completed buildings include the Museum of Fine Art, Boston, the German Parliament at the Reichstag, Berlin; the Great Court of the British Museum, London; Medical Research Centres, Stanford University, California; the Supreme Court, Singapore; Petronas University, Malaysia; Hearst Headquarters Tower, New York; Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, Hong Kong; Commerzbank Towers, Frankfurt; and airports in Beijing, Hong Kong and London. The practice has also developed sustainable masterplans for cities around the world, including Duisburg’s former industrial inner harbour, Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, the West Kowloon Cultural District in Hong Kong, Trafalgar Square in London and the Port of Marseilles.

Norman Foster became the 21st Pritzker Architecture Prize Laureate in 1999 and was awarded the Praemium Imperiale Award for Architecture in Tokyo in 2002. He received the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal for Architecture (1994), the Royal Gold Medal for Architecture (1983), and the Gold Medal of the French Academy of Architecture (1991). In 2009, he became the 29th laureate of the Prince of Asturias Award for the Arts. He is a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 1990 he was granted a Knighthood in the Queen’s Birthday Honours, appointed by the Queen to the Order of Merit in 1997 and in 1999 was honoured with a Life Peerage in the Queen's Birthday Honours List, as Lord Foster of Thames Bank.