Are there any situations in which frequency-specific microcurrent should not be used?

People who should not receive FSM treatment include those who have pacemakers, implanted pumps, or uncontrolled seizures, and women who are pregnant.

In addition, certain frequencies should not be used in cases of acute infection, new scar tissue (within 6 weeks), and acute fractures. Please discuss any of these concerns with your provider during consultation so that appropriate recommendations can be made.

What are the risks and side effects of frequency-specific microcurrent treatment?

The side effects of FSM treatment are usually very rare and mild, and may include nausea (feeling sick to the stomach) and drowsiness.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 08/13/2015.

References

  • Visceral and Somatic Disorders: Tissue Softening with Frequency Specific Microcurrent, McMakin C, Oschman J, Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2012, Vol. 18, Number 00, pp 1-8.
  • Frequency Specific Microcurrent in Pain Management, Textbook for practitioners, Carolyn McMakin author, Elsevier Science Press, Edinburgh, 2010.
  • The efficacy of frequency specific microcurrent therapy on delayed onset muscle soreness, Curtis D, Fallows S, Morris M, McMakin C, Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies; 2010; 14 (3): 272-9.
  • Non-pharmacologic treatment of shingles, McMakin C, Practical Pain Management, 2010, Vol 10; 4; 24-29.
  • Non-pharmacologic treatment of neuropathic pain using Frequency Specific Microcurrent, McMakin, C, The Pain Practitioner, Fall, 2010, pp 68-73.

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