How is frequency-specific microcurrent applied?

To treat a patient with FSM, the caregiver first sets the frequencies to be used for that particular condition. In many cases, the frequencies are set at two different levels; for example, one microcurrent channel might be set at 10 Hz, and the second at 40 Hz.

The current is most often applied with a moistened towel or with skin patches. It’s very important for the patient to be well hydrated (drink plenty of fluids) before FSM treatment.

How long do the effects of a frequency-specific microcurrent treatment last?

Depending on the condition and the patient’s level of pain, the effects of an FSM treatment for pain can last several days or longer. For acute injuries, lasting pain relief can often be achieved.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 08/13/2015.

References

  • Visceral and Somatic Disorders: Tissue Softening with Frequency Specific Microcurrent, McMakin C, Oschman J, Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2012, Vol. 18, Number 00, pp 1-8.
  • Frequency Specific Microcurrent in Pain Management, Textbook for practitioners, Carolyn McMakin author, Elsevier Science Press, Edinburgh, 2010.
  • The efficacy of frequency specific microcurrent therapy on delayed onset muscle soreness, Curtis D, Fallows S, Morris M, McMakin C, Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies; 2010; 14 (3): 272-9.
  • Non-pharmacologic treatment of shingles, McMakin C, Practical Pain Management, 2010, Vol 10; 4; 24-29.
  • Non-pharmacologic treatment of neuropathic pain using Frequency Specific Microcurrent, McMakin, C, The Pain Practitioner, Fall, 2010, pp 68-73.

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