Do I have to stay in the hospital for a bunion correction surgery?

Bunion correction surgery is performed in an operating room. In most cases the patient will go to sleep for this procedure and also receive some numbing injections to make the foot more comfortable after the procedure. Bunion correction surgery is almost always performed as an outpatient procedure.

What is the recovery like?

The recovery is generally longer than most people would guess. When a bone is cut, it generally takes about 8 to 12 weeks for that bone to fully heal. Therefore, after bunion correction surgery, it is not uncommon for the patient to not be allowed to put all of their weight on the foot for this period of time. Crutches, a walker, or scooter is commonly needed.

It is also common to have to wear a protective sandal or boot to protect the foot while it is healing. After about 3 months, the foot is healed and activity can resume and progress from there. Swelling is one of the most common symptoms that irritate people after surgery. Swelling can last 6 to 9 months after bunion surgery.

What is the outcome of bunion correction surgery?

Once the healing has occurred and swelling is resolved (around 6 months), most patients are able to fit more comfortably into shoes and are happier with the overall shape and function of the foot.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 11/08/2017.

References

  • Faber FW, Kleinrensink Gj, Verhoog MV, et al. Mobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint in relation to hallux valgus deformity: anatomical and biomechanical aspects. Foot Ankle Int 1999;20:651-656.
  • Ferrari J, Higgins JP, Prior TD. Interventions for treating hallux valgus (abductovalgus) and bunions. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2004;CD000964.
  • Torkki M, Malmivaara A, Seitsalo S, et al. Surgery vs. orthosis vs. watchful waiting for hallux valgus: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2001;285:2474-2480.
  • Vanore JV, Christensen JC, Kravitz SR, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of first metatarsophalangeal joint disorders. Section 1: Hallux valgus. _J Foot Ankle Surg _2003;42:112-123.
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Bunion Surgery. Accessed 3/26/2018.

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