When should wheezing be treated by a healthcare provider?

See your healthcare provider if your wheezing is new, if it keeps coming back, or if it’s accompanied by any of the following symptoms:

  • Shortness of breath.
  • Coughing.
  • Chest tightness or chest pain.
  • Fever.
  • Rapid breathing.
  • Unexplained swelling of your feet or legs.
  • Loss of voice.
  • Swelling of the lips or tongue.
  • A bluish tinge around your skin, mouth or nails.

When should I go to the Emergency Room?

If your skin, mouth or nails are turning blue, then you aren’t getting enough air into your lungs. This is a medical emergency and you should have a family member or friend take you to the nearest urgent care or emergency room. If you’re alone, call 911 and describe your breathing.

If you suddenly start wheezing after a bee sting, after you take a new medication or eat a new food, that could indicate an allergic reaction and you should go to the emergency room immediately.

Whatever the cause of your wheezing, there are things you can do to get relief. Follow your healthcare provider’s directions, don’t smoke, take all medications as prescribed and run a vaporizer or humidifier to moisten the air. Doing all of these things will help you breathe easier.

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