When should I seek help?

If you suspect that you or someone you know has an eating disorder – the person has an unhealthy preoccupation with their weight and size and/or appears extremely interested in food – seek help immediately. Eating disorders can become increasingly dangerous the longer they go untreated.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 12/12/2019.

References

  • Rome ES, Strandjord SE. Eating Disorders. Pediatrics in Review 2016;37(8);323-336. Accessed 10/12/2019.
  • Dickstein LP. Franco KN, Rome ES, Auron M. Recognizing, managing medical consequences of eating disorders in primary care. Cleve Clinic J Med 2014;81(4):255-263. Accessed 10/12/2019.
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness. Eating Disorders. Accessed 10/12/2019.
  • National Eating Disorders Association. Bulimia Nervosa. Accessed 10/12/2019.
  • Academy for Eating Disorders. Eating Disorders. A Guide to Medical Care. AED Report 2016. 3rd edition. Accessed 10/12/2019.
  • Hay PJ Claudino AM. Bulimia nervosa. BMJ Clin Evid 2010; July 19:1009. Accessed 10/12/2019.
  • American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Arlington, VA, American Psychiatric Association, 2013. Accessed 10/12/2019.
  • Gwirtsman HE, Mitchell JE, Ebert MH. Chapter 26. Eating Disorders. In: Ebert MH, Loosen PT, Nurcombe B, Leckman JF. eds. CURRENT Diagnosis & Treatment: Psychiatry, 2e. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2008. Accessed 10/12/2019.
  • Mehler PS. Medical complications of bulimia nervosa and their treatments. Int J Eat Disord. 2011 Mar; 44(2):95–104. Accessed 10/12/2019.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy