When should I see a healthcare provider about basal cell carcinoma (BCC)?

It is important to contact a healthcare provider any time you have a skin problem that does not resolve. This means developing any new or larger mole, lump or sore, or new symptoms such as pain or itchiness. If you have had BCC or another type of skin cancer, you will probably be given a recommended schedule of needed appointments. You should follow up on these appointments as directed.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 07/05/2019.

References

  • Skin Cancer Foundation. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Accessed 7/5/2019.
  • American Academy of Dermatology. Basal cell carcinoma. Accessed 7/5/2019.
  • National Cancer Institute. Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version. Accessed 7/5/2019.
  • Krishna SM, Garrett AB, Forman SB. Basal Cell Carcinoma. In: Kelly A, Taylor SC, Lim HW, Serrano A. eds. Taylor and Kelly's Dermatology for Skin of Color, 2e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
  • Tang JY, Epstein, Jr. EH, Oro AE. Basal Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome. In: Kang S, Amagai M, Bruckner AL, Enk AH, Margolis DJ, McMichael AJ, Orringer JS. eds. Fitzpatrick's Dermatology, 9e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
  • Merck Manual Consumer Version. Basal cell carcinoma. Accessed 7/5/2019.

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