What are the treatments for low blood pressure?

The treatments for low blood pressure depend on what caused the condition. Your doctor will work with you to address the cause of the hypotension. In severe cases of hypotension, your doctor may give you IV fluids to raise your blood pressure.

Depending on a variety of factors, such as your age and the type of hypotension, your doctor may recommend one or more of the following: dietary changes, lifestyle changes and/or medications.

To make dietary changes, your doctor might tell you to:

  • Stay hydrated by drinking more water throughout the day.
  • Drink less alcohol.
  • Increase your salt intake slightly because sodium raises blood pressure.
  • Eat smaller, healthy meals and limit carbohydrates.

You can take several steps to avoid a sudden drop in blood pressure. Your doctor may recommend that you make the following lifestyle changes:

  • Wear compression stockings.
  • Get up slowly after you’ve been sitting or lying down.
  • Avoid standing for long periods of time.
  • Sit up and breathe deeply for a few minutes before getting out of bed.

Your doctor might prescribe medications like:

What are the side effects of the treatment for low blood pressure?

There are no side effects for the lifestyle and dietary changes that can treat hypotension.

The medications used to treat hypotension have several side effects, some of which may be serious. Fludrocortisone can make certain infections worse, so it’s essential to discuss this medication with your doctor. The most common side effects from fludrocortisone are:

  • Increased risk of infection.
  • Nausea, bloating, or other stomach problems.
  • Dizziness.
  • Insomnia (problems sleeping).

The most common side effects from midodrine are:

  • Numbness or tingling.
  • Itching.
  • Goosebumps and chills.

What are the complications associated with low blood pressure?

While it’s not usually a serious medical condition, hypotension can cause injuries due to fainting and falling. If hypotension is left untreated, the brain, heart and other organs can’t get enough blood and cannot work properly. Severe hypotension can lead to shock, which can be fatal.

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