How is menorrhagia treated?

Treatment for menorrhagia depends on how serious the bleeding is, the cause of the bleeding, your health, age, and medical history. Also, treatment depends on your response to certain medicines and your wants and needs. You may not want to have a period at all, or just want to reduce the amount of bleeding. In addition, your decision to get pregnant or not will affect what treatment you choose. If you do not have anemia, you can choose to not have treatment.

Common treatments include:

  • Iron supplements to put more iron into your blood
  • Ibuprofen to reduce pain and amount of bleeding
  • Birth control to make periods more regular and reduce bleeding (pills, vaginal ring, patch)
  • Intrauterine contraception (IUD) to make periods more regular and reduce bleeding
  • Hormone therapy to reduce bleeding
  • Desmopressin nasal spray to stop bleeding for certain bleeding disorders
  • Antifibrinolytic medicines to reduce bleeding
  • Dilation and curettage to reduce bleeding by removing the top layer of uterus lining
  • Operative hysteroscopy to remove fibroids and polyps and remove lining of uterus
  • Endometrial ablation or resection to remove all or part of the lining of the uterus
  • Hysterectomy to surgically remove the uterus and you will stop having your period

How is menorrhagia managed?

To manage menorrhagia, some women stay home on days when they are bleeding heavily. Others leave the house if they know a bathroom will be nearby. Also, it is a good practice to keep pads and/or tampons in your purse or at work. Wearing dark pants or skirts can help if you are worried about stains on light-colored clothing. Additionally, you can use a waterproof sheet on your mattress to prevent stains.

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