What are the complications of endometrial hyperplasia?

All types of hyperplasia can cause abnormal and heavy bleeding that can make you anemic. Anemia develops when your body doesn’t have enough iron-rich red blood cells.

Untreated atypical endometrial hyperplasia can become cancerous. Endometrial or uterine cancer develops in about 8% of women with untreated simple atypical endometrial hyperplasia. Close to 30% of women with complex atypical endometrial hyperplasia who don’t get treatment develop cancer.

How is endometrial hyperplasia managed or treated?

If you’re at increased risk of cancer due to atypical endometrial hyperplasia, your healthcare provider may recommend a hysterectomy to remove the uterus. After a hysterectomy, you won’t be able to get pregnant. Many people see symptoms improve with less invasive progestin treatments. Progestin comes in many forms:

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