What can I do to feel better if I have morning sickness?

There are a few things you can do to feel better. These include:

  • Eat a few crackers or toast in the morning to help settle your stomach. Keep a few crackers at bedside and eat a couple before getting up.
  • Eat 5 or 6 small meals a day instead of 3 large meals.
  • Avoid spicy and fatty foods. Eat bland foods such as bananas, rice, dry toast, plain baked potato, gelatin, broth, eggs, tofu, or applesauce.
  • Eat healthy snacks between meals, such as yogurt, peanut butter on apple slices or celery, cheese, milk, or nuts.
  • Drink plenty of fluids, especially water, throughout the day.
  • Take your prenatal vitamins with a snack. If your prenatal vitamin contains iron, try taking it at bedtime. Talk with your doctor about other vitamin options.
  • Avoid odors, flickering lights, other situations that bother you and trigger your nausea.
  • Make tea with real grated ginger or try ginger candies.
  • Get plenty of rest.
  • Keep rooms well ventilated, turn on a fan, or go outside from time to time to get some fresh air.
  • Smell fresh-smelling, pleasant scents such as lemon, orange, or mint.

Other methods may help reduce nausea. Talk with your healthcare provider before trying these:

  • Acupressure wrist band. These bands apply pressure to certain points on the wrist.
  • Acupuncture. In this treatment method, thin needles are put into the skin.

Do not use marijuana to treat morning sickness! It has not been shown to be safe for your baby during pregnancy.

What medications are available to treat morning sickness?

Your healthcare provider may recommend taking vitamin B6 (also called pyridoxine) and doxylamine. Doxylamine is also used as a sleep aid and to treat hay fever or other allergies. Both products are available over-the-counter and don’t need a prescription. However, there is a pill that contains the combination of these 2 products. It is available by prescription only and is known by the trade name Diclegis®. Unlike the separate over-the-counter products, Diclegis® is a slow-release single pill. This may be more convenient or helpful for women who have trouble (for example, have a gag reflex) taking many pills per day.

Medications to prevent nausea (also called antiemetics) can also be prescribed. If these drugs don’t help, other drug classes can be tried including antihistamines and anticholinergics. You and your healthcare provider will decide which medications work best for you.

Does morning sickness harm my baby?

Mild to moderate nausea and vomiting of pregnancy usually is not harmful to you or your baby. However, it can become a problem if you can’t keep food or liquid down, become dehydrated, and lose weight. Unmanaged severe nausea and vomiting can prevent you from getting the nutrition you need and affect the weight of your baby at birth.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 06/29/2017.

References

  • The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Morning Sickness: Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy Accessed 6/13/2017.
  • Lee NM, Saha S. Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy. Gastroenterol Clin North Am 2011 June;40(2):309-34.
  • Herrell HE. Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy. Am Fam Physician 2014 Jun 15;89(12):965-970.

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