How is proteinuria treated?

Treatment depends on the underlying condition that caused proteinuria. Each condition requires different treatments.

If kidney disease is confirmed, a treatment plan might include medication, diet changes, weight loss and exercise. Diabetes and hypertension patients with proteinuria might need blood pressure medication, and those with diabetes will have to control their blood sugar. Diabetes patients should receive glomerular filtration rate (GFR) blood tests every year and may be referred to a nephrologist, a doctor who specializes in the kidneys.

Pregnant women with preeclampsia should be watched carefully. The condition, although serious during pregnancy, usually resolves itself once the baby is born. Proteinuria patients with low blood pressure should schedule annual urine tests and blood pressure checks.

If proteinuria isn’t accompanied by diabetes, high blood pressure or any other medical condition, blood pressure medication still might be prescribed to prevent kidney damage. Blood pressure and urine should be checked every six months to make sure kidney disease isn’t present. As for those with mild or temporary proteinuria, treatment may not be necessary.

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