How is uterine prolapse treated?

There are surgical and non-surgical options for treating uterine prolapse. Your healthcare provider will pick your treatment path based on the severity of your prolapse, your general health, age and whether or not you want children in the future. Treatment is generally effective for most women. Treatment options can include:

Non-surgical options

  • Exercise: Special exercises, called Kegel exercises, can help strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. This may be the only treatment needed in mild cases of uterine prolapse. To do Kegel exercises, tighten your pelvic muscles as if you are trying to hold back urine. Hold the muscles tight for a few seconds and then release. Repeat 10 times. You may do these exercises anywhere and at any time (up to four times a day).
  • Vaginal pessary: A pessary is a rubber or plastic doughnut-shaped device that fits around or under the lower part of the uterus (cervix). This device helps prop up the uterus and hold it in place. A healthcare provider will fit and insert the pessary, which must be cleaned frequently and removed before sex.

Surgical options

  • Hysterectomy and prolapse repair: Uterine prolapse may be treated by removing the uterus in a surgical procedure called a hysterectomy. This may be done through a cut (incision) made in the vagina (vaginal hysterectomy) or through the abdomen (abdominal hysterectomy). Hysterectomy is major surgery, and removing the uterus means pregnancy is no longer possible.
  • Prolapse repair without hysterectomy: This procedure involves putting the uterus back into its normal position. Uterine suspension may be done by reattaching the pelvic ligaments to the lower part of the uterus to hold it in place. The surgery can be done through the vagina or through the abdomen depending on the technique that is used.

What are the complications of uterine prolapse?

If you don’t treat a uterine prolapse, it can impact other organs in the pelvic area of your body. A prolapsed uterus can interfere with your bowel and bladder. It can also negatively impact your sex life, causing you pain.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 12/30/2019.

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