How is thyroiditis treated?

How thyroiditis is treated depends on the type, symptoms, and phase of thyroiditis.

  • Thyrotoxic phase: Usually temporary, it will eventually either recover and go to the euthyroid phase, or go to the hypothyroid phase. This hypothyroid phase could be temporary or permanent. It may not be necessary to treat symptoms in subacute, painless, or post-partum thyroiditis. During the thyrotoxic phase, treatment is symptomatic. Antithyroid medications are rarely needed.
  • Palpitations/anxiety/tremors/heat intolerance/increased sweating: These symptoms are treated with beta blockers.
  • Thyroidal pain: The pain can usually be managed with anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin or ibuprofen. If the pain is severe enough, steroid therapy may be required (not very often).
  • In other forms, treating the infection will be necessary to eliminate acute (suppurative) thyroiditis. Drug-induced thyroiditis generally lasts as long as the drugs are taken.
  • Hypothyroid phase: If necessary, thyroid hormone replacement therapy is used to treat hypothyroidism. This type of therapy usually continues for 6 to 12 months. Hashimoto's thyroiditis usually causes permanent hypothyroidism and requires continued treatment.

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