What can I expect if I have myofascial pain syndrome?

Each person’s pain — location of pain and severity — is unique. Pain can flare up from time to time or be ongoing and long lasting. Successful treatment usually requires finding healthcare providers you are comfortable with and following their treatment and management plan for reducing your pain.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 07/06/2020.

References

  • National Association of Myofascial Trigger Point Therapists. Myofascial Therapy. Accessed 7/1/2020.
  • American Society of Anesthesiologists. Myofascial Pain Syndrome. Accessed 7/1/2020.
  • Bernstein CD, Weiner DK. Chapter 123. Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndromes. In: Halter JB, Ouslander JG, Tinetti ME, Studenski S, High KP, Asthana S. eds. Hazzard's Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, 6e. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2009. Accessed 7/1/2020.
  • Chandola HC, Chakraborty A. Fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndrome-a dilemma. Indian J Anaesth. 2009;53(5):575-81. Accessed 7/1/2020.
  • Rodante JA, Al Hassan QA, Almeer ZS. Myofascial Pain Syndrome: Uncovering the Root Causes. 2012;12(6). Accessed 7/1/2020.
  • Weller JL, Comeau D, Otis JAD. Myofascial Pain. Semin Neurol 2018;38(6):640-643. Accessed 7/1/2020.
  • Gerwin RD. Myofascial Trigger Point Pain Syndromes. Semin Neurol 2016;36(5):469-473. Accessed 7/1/2020.
  • Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Can Diet Help with Inflammation? Accessed 7/1/2020.

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