When should I seek medical advice?

Most cases of bursitis improve without any treatment over a few weeks. See your healthcare provider if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Pain that interferes with your day-to-day activities.
  • Soreness that doesn’t improve despite self-care measures.
  • Bursitis that comes back (recurs).
  • Fever.
  • Redness, swelling or warmth in the injured area.

For most people, bursitis is preventable. The first step is figuring out what movements caused the irritation. Then you can avoid those movements or find workarounds, like cushions or devices that can ease joint pressure. Take the necessary steps at home and get medical care, if needed, so you can regain pain-free use of your joint

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 05/29/2020.

References

  • American College of Rheumatology. Tendinitis (Bursitis). Accessed 6/1/2020.
  • Arthritis Foundation. Bursitis. Accessed 6/1/2020.
  • FamilyDoctor.org/American Academy of Family Physicians. Bursitis of the Hip. Accessed 6/1/2020.
  • Merck Manual. Bursitis. Accessed 6/1/2020.
  • National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Bursitis. Accessed 6/1/2020.

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