Overview

Overview

Cleveland Clinic’s Minority Men’s Health Center was founded in 2003. It is one of the first programs in the country to broadly address the health issues that particularly impact African American and Hispanic men. The center provides disease screenings and health and wellness information, offers primary medical care and referrals to specialists, conducts research, and educates the public and healthcare providers about minority health concerns.

What We Treat

What We Treat

The Minority Men's Health Center provides health screenings for the early detection, prevention and/or treatment for a number of medical conditions which disproportionately affect minority male populations such as:

The Minority Men's Health Center also provides services such as:

  • Men’s urological health examinations and screenings
  • Men’s primary healthcare services
  • Referrals for specialized care including kidney transplants, weight loss surgery, colorectal cancer
    and digestive diseases
  • Shared medical appointments
  • Prescription assistance
  • Spiritual care
Minority Men's Health Fair

Minority Men's Health Fair

Actor Bill Cobbs and Dr. Charles Modlin discuss Minority Mens Health Fair.

The Minority Men’s Health Fair is held annually in April and offers free screenings and health information for men of all ages.

Details about registration and the event will be available in January, 2019.

Governor Kasich welcomes men to the Men's Minority Health Fair

Our Team

Our Team

Charles Modlin, MD, MBA
Charles Modlin, MD, MBA
Center Director, Minority Men's Health Center
Did You Know?

Did You Know?

  • The life expectancy for African American men is 7.1 years less than for Caucasian men
  • African American men have the highest rates of lung, prostate and colon cancers of any population in the world
  • Stroke kills 180 percent more black men than it does white men
  • More than one-third of all African American men have high blood pressure
  • Hispanic men are twice as likely as Caucasian men to have liver cancer, and almost twice as likely to die from it
  • Hispanic men are more likely Caucasian men to have diabetes, diabetes-related kidney failure, and to die from the disease
  • Hispanic men have a chronic liver disease rate that is twice that of Caucasian men, and liver disease is the third leading cause of death for Hispanic men ages 55-64
  • Hispanic men are more likely than Caucasian men to be overweight or obese
News

News

Dr. Charles Modlin Recognized for Minority Healthcare Initiatives

Dr. Charles Modlin, Director of the Minority Men’s Health Center, was honored as the 2016 Black Professional of the Year by the Black Professionals Association Charitable Foundation (BPACF). Learn more about the challenges of healthcare disparities among minorities as well as Dr. Modlin’s work with the Minority Men’s Health Center and the Minority Men’s Health Fair.

Appointments & Locations

Appointments & Locations

How can I make an appointment?

Call 216.444.5600.

Where do I go?

The Minority Men’s Health Center sees patients at three convenient locations:

Cleveland Clinic Main Campus - Q Building (Glickman Tower), 8th floor
9500 Euclid Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44195
Wednesdays: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Stephanie Tubbs Jones Health Center
13944 Euclid Ave.
East Cleveland, OH 44112
Tuesdays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

South Pointe Hospital Medical Office Building, 2nd Floor
20000 Harvard Rd.
Warrensville Heights, OH 44122
First and third Thursdays of the month: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Why should I make an appointment with the center?

Because you may be at increased risk for medical problems that can be prevented or successfully treated if caught early enough. For various reasons— genetics, living and working conditions, barriers to getting medical care — African American and Hispanic men are more likely than Caucasian men to develop some life-threatening diseases and medical problems, and are at greater risk of dying from them. The Minority Men’s Health Center can help you stay well and improve your health, monitor potential health risks and take preventive steps, and detect and treat existing medical conditions.