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Robotically Assisted Removal of Cardiac Tumors

Robotically Assisted Heart Surgery: Intracardiac Tumor: Atrial Myxoma

Robotically assisted removal of intracardiac tumors is a type of minimally invasive heart surgery performed with an endoscopic, closed chest approach.

New approaches to minimally invasive heart surgery
What is an intracardiac tumor?

An intracardiac tumor can be any tumor of the heart, either malignant or benign. The most common tumor of the heart is a benign atrial myxoma, which most frequently occurs in the left atrium. It causes symptoms when its growth produces a tumor so large it obstructs blood flow through the heart chambers. This type of tumor increases the risk of stroke. Heart surgery is required to remove the cardiac tumor. Removal of these tumors is almost always curative and greatly reduces the risk of stroke.

Robotically-Assisted Cardiac Tumor Surgery: smaller incision

During the robotically-assisted tumor removal procedure, the surgeon’s hands control the movement and placement of the endoscopic instruments through small incisions in the left atrium, and the instruments are used to remove the tumor.

What are the benefits of robotically-assisted surgery?

Compared with traditional surgery, the benefits of robotically-assisted surgery include:

  • Smaller incisions with minimal scarring
  • Less trauma to the patient, including less pain
  • Shorter hospital stay (usually 3 to 4 days)
  • Decreased use of pain medications
  • Less bleeding
  • Decreased risk of infection
  • Shorter recovery and quicker return to daily and professional activities: The patient can resume normal activities and work as soon as he or she feels up to it; there are no specific activity restrictions after robotically-assisted surgery
Surgeons who perform robotically assisted heart surgery

Robotically assisted surgery is performed by specially trained cardiovascular surgeons. Cleveland Clinic Heart Surgeons who perform robotic assisted surgery include:

Some of these surgeons perform only specific types of robotically assisted heart surgery. We would be happy to help you find the right surgeon to treat your medical condition .

If you would like to find out whether you are a candidate for robot assisted cardiac tumor surgery or learn more about minimally invasive heart surgery, contact us or call the Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute Resource & Information Nurse at 216.445.9288 or toll-free at 866.289.6911. We would be happy to help you.

Robotically assisted heart surgeries
For more information:

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Images used with permission by © Intuitive Surgical, Inc.

Reviewed: 03/15

Talk to a Nurse: Mon. - Fri., 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. (ET)

Call a Heart & Vascular Nurse locally 216.445.9288 or toll-free 866.289.6911.

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This information is provided by Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

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