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2011 Physician eNewsletter

 

PCI for Left Main Disease: A Viable Option

With the largest randomized clinical trial of left main patients underway, Cleveland Clinic helps lead research to explore interventional alternatives to open heart surgery for patients with complex blockages.

Surgery has always been the go-to treatment for patients with left main disease, which can compromise up to 70 percent of blood flow to the heart. But percutaneous coronary intervention could be an option for well-selected patients with the disease, and neutral outcomes from recent randomized trials where patients received angioplasty and stents further position interventional therapy as a viable option for some patients.

Informing Patients about Clinical Trials

Keep it simple, inform them early. Let patients know about all of their options by including clinical trials when discussing treatment.

Primary care physicians and referring cardiologists play a critical role in getting patients involved in important clinical trials. Patients trust them for information and guidance. And when patients can learn about trials for their condition long before they arrive at Cleveland Clinic for a procedure, they are more likely to consider enrolling.

Imaging Debate: MPI or CT Angiography?

When is it best to use myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) or CT angiography to evaluate patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease?

The wide availability of CT coronary angiography for assessing coronary artery disease (CAD) introduces an interesting question concerning cardiovascular imaging. What is the best way to manage patients: stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to assess physiologic criteria; or CT coronary angiography to identify anatomic criteria?

Diagnose This

A case study from our Fall Physician eNewsletter

Sheila* is a 22-year old mother of two children who was living an otherwise healthy life until one day she experienced a sudden numbness and tingling in her upper extremities. She could not communicate, though she was aware of what was going on around her. The next day, she became feverish and her blood pressure dropped to the 60s.

*Not her real name.

CME Calendar

Healthcare professionals are invited to attend the following upcoming symposia.

Cardiovascular CT Training Program 2011

September 16-23, 2011
Location: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

Shaping the Future of Cardiovascular Care: Progress and Controversies

October 5-7, 2011
InterContinental Hotel and Bank of America Conference Center, Cleveland, Ohio

HVI Referrals

To refer patients to a Cleveland Clinic Heart & Vascular specialist, please call:

  • Cardiovascular Medicine - 216.444.6697
  • Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - 877.843.2781
  • Vascular Surgery - 216.444.4508

Same day appointments are available.

Monitoring Patients with Heart Failure

Remote monitoring devices present significant potential for Cleveland Clinic patients who are at risk for worsening heart failure and the physicians who treat them.

Remote monitoring is an under-tapped technology that can be utilized to identify patient vulnerabilities for worsening heart failure and to potentially avert costly hospital visits. Cleveland Clinic researchers are currently conducting one of the largest multi-center national studies focused on understanding how device-based remote monitoring can be used to manage patients with heart failure. The technology has potential to intercept patients before they need to seek hospital care. But the challenge for medical institutions is how to manage the vast streams of data and how to best act on newfound information.

Robotic Mitral Valve Repair: Settling the Controversy

A Cleveland Clinic study shows that robotic MV repair is safe, effective and cost-competitive, making it a great success story in modern surgery.

Robotic mitral valve (MV) repair is as safe and effective as conventional approaches, and it’s less invasive and requires shorter hospital stays. Cleveland Clinic’s large registry of cardiovascular surgery cases enabled a comprehensive data review.

Choosing Ablation to Treat AF

Studies show better long-term results for ablation vs. drug therapy in treating patients with atrial fibrillation.

Studies show that for many patients ablation is a superior method of treating atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to drug therapy, and today the threshold for turning to ablation has decreased. Some savvy patients are asking for this procedure rather than medications. Meanwhile, results from multi-center trials are supporting ablation as an effective long-term therapy for managing AF.

Image of the Issue

With a non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT) scan, physicians can get a clearer picture of whether a patient’s risk factors such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels or high body mass index should be treated more aggressively with a non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT) scan.

Diagnose This

A case study from our Spring Physician eNewsletter

Dan* is 48 and happily married. Until two years ago, he was sexually active without any limitations. Then, he presented with left leg claudication symptoms and erectile dysfunction, despite treatments with Sildenafil (Viagra) up to 100 mg. Dan has a history of smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery and peripheral arterial disease. What could be the cause of Dan’s erectile dysfunction?

*Not his real name

CME Calendar

Healthcare professionals are invited to attend the following upcoming symposia.

Cleveland Clinic Health Care Quality Innovation Summit

May 11-13, 2011
Cleveland Clinic Main Campus, Cleveland, Ohio

Shaping the Future of Cardiovascular Care: Progress and Controversies

October 5-7, 2011
InterContinental Hotel and Bank of America Conference Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Cardiovascular CT Training Program 2011

June 3-10, 2011
Cleveland Clinic Main Campus, Cleveland, Ohio

HVI Referrals

To refer patients to a Cleveland Clinic heart and vascular specialist please call:

  • Cardiovascular Medicine - 216.444.6697
  • Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - 877.843.2781
  • Vascular Surgery - 216.444.4508

Same day appointments are available.

Reviewed: 09/13

Talk to a Nurse: Mon. - Fri., 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. (ET)

Call a Heart & Vascular Nurse locally 216.445.9288 or toll-free 866.289.6911.

Schedule an Appointment

Toll-free 800.659.7822

This information is provided by Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

© Copyright 2014 Cleveland Clinic. All rights reserved.

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