Appointments

866.320.4573

Request an Appointment

Questions

800.223.2273

Contact us with Questions

Expand Content

Types of Coronary Artery Disease

Acute Coronary Syndromes

Three types of heart attack occur because of sudden rupture of plaque inside the coronary artery. These depend on the location of blockage, amount of time blood flow is blocked, and damage that occurs. Emergency medical care is critical for these life-threatening conditions.

Advanced Ischemic Heart Disease

Patients with aggressive heart conditions are at risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. They may have already had at least one coronary artery bypass surgery, multiple stents or angioplasty procedures, or still suffer from chest pain even after receiving optimum treatment.

Bifurcation Blockage

Fatty build-up is more likely to occur in the Y-junction where vessels branch off from the main coronary artery because of changes in blood flow. Narrowing in this region is called bifurcation blockage, and it is treated using special techniques to prop up the vessel.

Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction)

“Myo” means muscle and cardial refers to the heart. Infarction means death of tissue due to lack of blood supply. Heart attack is myocardial infarction, and it causes permanent damage to the heart muscle.

Microvessel Disease

This type of cardiovascular disease occurs when tiny blood vessels narrow when they should widen. This starves the heart muscle of oxygen and causes chest pain that can impact quality of life. This disease affects women and can be treated by medications to ease pain and lifestyle changes.

Stent Restenosis

When an artery or large blood vessel is treated with a stent to prop open the vessel and allow for healthy blood flow, it can collapse and require medical attention again. An experienced cardiac suggest interventional procedures that will remedy the situation.

Total Coronary Occlusion

A complete blockage in a coronary artery can lead to heart attack because of restricted blood flow to the heart muscle. When the blockage is more than three months old, it is called a chronic coronary occlusion.


Reviewed: 04/10

Talk to a Nurse: Mon. - Fri., 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. (ET)

Call a Heart & Vascular Nurse locally 216.445.9288 or toll-free 866.289.6911.

Schedule an Appointment

Toll-free 800.659.7822

This information is provided by Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

© Copyright 2014 Cleveland Clinic. All rights reserved.

HealthHub from Cleveland Clinic

Read the Latest from Our Experts About cctopics » Heart & Vascular Health
After Heart Surgery, This Ordinary Drug Could Be Right for Your Chest Pain
11/26/14 8:00 a.m.
You might expect to have some pain in your chest after heart surgery. But if you have chest pain and several other symptoms, there’s a common problem that may be to blame. ...
by Joseph F. Sabik III, MD
Low-Carb Eating May Be Best for Weight Loss, Heart Health
11/25/14 6:00 a.m.
If you’re looking for a heart-healthy weight-loss diet to try, it appears that low-carbohydrate might be more e...
Thanksgiving Dinner: Serve This, Not That (Infographic)
11/24/14 10:05 a.m.
Thanksgiving dinner is the ultimate family feast. Overeating turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, glaze...
High Blood Pressure? Don’t Take Vitamin D for It (Video)
11/20/14 8:31 a.m.
Sellers of vitamin D claim the nutrient can lower your blood pressure. But don’t believe the hype. Despite clai...
When Your Heart Stents Narrow, Brachytherapy Can Help
11/19/14 8:22 a.m.
Cardiac stents are an effective, nonsurgical way of holding a narrowed or blocked artery open to increase blood...