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A Prospective Cohort Study to Describe the Evolution of Persistent Hyperparathyroidism in Kidney Transplant Recipients

Study:

A Prospective Cohort Study to Describe the Evolution of Persistent Hyperparathyroidism in Kidney Transplant Recipients

Rationale:

n/a

Purpose:

The purpose of this study is to see if Hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is common in people who receive a kidney transplant. Patients with HPT often have high parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and may have large parathyroid glands in the neck. Patients with HPT can develop bone disease (osteodystrophy). This bone disease can cause bone pain, fractures, and poor formation of red blood cells. Other problems from HPT may include increases in blood levels of calcium (hypercalcemia) and low blood levels of phosphorus (hypophosphatemia). The high calcium levels may cause calcium to deposit in body tissues. Calcium deposits can cause arthritis (joint pain and swelling), muscle inflammation, itching, gangrene (death of soft tissue), heart and lung problems, or kidney transplant dysfunction (worsening of kidney transplant function). The purpose of this research study is to better understand the evolution of Hpt in people during the first 12 months after receiving a kidney transplant.

Study Status: Completed

Recruiting:
n/a

Condition Intervention Phase
Hyperparathyroidism n/a N/A

Verified by The Cleveland Clinic January, 2012

Sponsored by: The Cleveland Clinic
Information provided by: The Cleveland Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01163669

Study Type: Interventional

Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort, Time Perspective: Prospective

Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, Ohio 44195
United States

T Srinivas, MD, MD., Principal Investigator

This information is abridged to display results relevant only to Cleveland Clinic. To see complete record visit ClinicalTrials.gov
  Information obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov on
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