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Atorvastatin (Lipitor) Therapy in Patients With Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) at Risk for Multiple Sclerosis

Study:

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multi-Center Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Atorvastatin in Patients With Clinically Isolated Syndrome and High Risk of Conversion to Multiple Sclerosis (ITN020AI)

Rationale:

n/a

Purpose:

Patients who have been diagnosed with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) often develop problems related to the central nervous system, which controls the nerves in the body. Some of these patients may later be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), a progressive disease of the nervous system. The purpose of this study is to determine if the drug atorvastatin is helpful to CIS patients. Study hypothesis: Early intervention with atorvastatin in patients with CIS will result in a state of immunological tolerance.

Study Status: Completed

Recruiting:
n/a

Condition Intervention Phase
Multiple Sclerosis Drug: Atorvastatin
Drug: Placebo
Phase 2

Verified by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) April, 2012

Sponsored by: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Information provided by: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00094172

Study Type: Interventional

Study Design: Allocation: Randomized, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose: Prevention

Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Cleveland, Ohio 44195
United States

Scott Zamvil, MD, PhD., Study Chair
Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, PhD., Study Chair

This information is abridged to display results relevant only to Cleveland Clinic. To see complete record visit ClinicalTrials.gov
  Information obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov on
Link to the current ClinicalTrials.gov record.

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