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Diseases & Conditions

Neck Sprain

A neck sprain is a stretched ligament or muscle in the neck. A neck sprain may occur without any obvious injury but sometimes it may be caused by a sudden impact with an object. An impact may force the neck to quickly extend beyond its normal range, and then snap back forcefully. This is commonly called a whiplash injury. Rear-end car accidents, head jerking during amusement park rides, or being kicked are the most common forms of impact that may cause a neck sprain.

What symptoms will I have with a neck sprain?

You will have neck pain that worsens with movement. Sometimes this pain will not appear until a full day or two after the event that caused it. You will most likely have neck stiffness that hinders your ability to move your neck. The back of your head might hurt. You may also have pain in the shoulders or upper back. Other symptoms that may happen with a neck sprain include:

  • Dizziness
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Fatigue
  • Patchy numbness in the hands or arms

If you notice these symptoms after a whiplash-type incident, see a doctor for an evaluation to rule out a more serious problem, such as damage to the spinal cord. Arm or leg weakness, difficulty walking, and an inability to control the bladder or bowels are signs of spinal cord injury. If you have immediate neck pain after the incident, go to an emergency room.

How is a neck sprain diagnosed?

A physical examination will review your posture, ability to move, and the position of your head and chin. The doctor will inspect the blood vessels in your neck and may listen to them with a stethoscope. He or she also may check:

  • The range of motion of your neck
  • The muscle strength in your arms
  • Your reflexes
  • Whether or not you can detect sensations

Imaging tests such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used, but most people with suspected neck sprain do not need these tests.

An MRI is a painless, noninvasive test that produces very clear pictures, or images, of the human body without the use of X-rays. MRI uses a large magnet, radio waves, and a computer to produce these images.

A CT scan is an X-ray procedure that combines many X-ray images with the help of a computer to create cross-sectional views of the body.

How is neck sprain treated?

Pain, inflammation, and tension may be treated by:

  • Analgesics and anti-inflammatory medications
  • Ice for the first 24 hours followed by heat applied to the neck through a moist towel
  • Muscle relaxants

Gentle movement of the neck is encouraged. Range of motion exercises may be prescribed by a physical therapist.

You may want to try sleeping with a rolled up towel under your neck for relief.

What can I expect from treatment?

Your head and neck pain should get better within a couple of weeks. If not, local anesthetic injections may be tried. Full recovery may take as long as 3 months. If you are still having symptoms after this time further evaluation by a spine specialist is appropriate.

References

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This information is provided by the Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition. This document was last reviewed on: 1/22/2014…#14517

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