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Diseases & Conditions

Sandhoff Disease

What is Sandhoff disease?

Sandhoff disease is a rare, genetic, lipid storage disorder resulting in the progressive deterioration of the central nervous system. It is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme beta-hexosaminidase, which results in the accumulation of certain fats (lipids) in the brain and other organs of the body. Sandhoff disease is a severe form of Tay-Sachs disease--which is prevalent primarily in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent--but it is not limited to any ethnic group. Onset of the disorder usually occurs at 6 months of age. Neurological symptoms may include motor weakness, startle reaction to sound, early blindness, progressive mental and motor deterioration, macrocephaly (an abnormally enlarged head), cherry-red spots in the eyes, seizures, and myoclonus (shock-like contractions of a muscle). Other symptoms may include frequent respiratory infections, doll-like facial appearance, and an enlarged liver and spleen.

Is there any treatment?

There is no specific treatment for Sandhoff disease. Supportive treatment includes proper nutrition and hydration and keeping the airway open. Anticonvulsants may initially control seizures. In other ongoing studies, a small number of children have received an experimental treatment using transplants of stem cells from umbilical cord blood. Although these limited trials have not yet produced a treatment or cure, scientists continue to study these and other investigational approaches.

What is the prognosis?

The prognosis for individuals with Sandhoff disease is poor. Death usually occurs by age 3 and is generally caused by respiratory infections.

What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), conducts research about lipid storage diseases in laboratories at the NIH and also supports additional research through grants to major medical institutions across the country.

Organizations

National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association
2001 Beacon Street, Suite 204
Brighton, MA 02135
Phone: 617.277.4463 
Toll-free: 800.90.NTSAD (906.8723)
Fax: 617.277.0134

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)
P.O. Box 1968
(55 Kenosia Avenue)
Danbury, CT 06813-1968
Phone: 203.744.0100
Voice Mail: 800.999.NORD (6673)
Fax: 203.798.2291

Source: National Institutes of Health; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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This information is provided by the Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition. This document was last reviewed on: 10/06/2011...#6086

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