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Diseases & Conditions

Joubert Syndrome

What is Joubert Syndrome?

Joubert syndrome is a rare brain malformation characterized by the absence or underdevelopment of the cerebellar vermis - an area of the brain that controls balance and coordination. The most common features of Joubert syndrome in infants include abnormally rapid breathing (hyperpnea), decreased muscle tone (hypotonia), jerky eye movements (oculomotor apraxia), mental retardation, and the inability to coordinate voluntary muscle movements (ataxia). Physical deformities may be present, such as extra fingers and toes (polydactyly), cleft lip or palate, and tongue abnormalities. Kidney and liver abnormalities can develop, and seizures may also occur.. Most cases of Joubert syndrome are sporadic (not inherited). In some families, however, Joubert syndrome appears to be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner (meaning both parents must have a copy of the mutation) via mutation in a number of genes, including NPHP1, AHI1, and CEP290.

Is there any treatment?

Treatment for Joubert syndrome is symptomatic and supportive. Infant stimulation and physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal breathing patterns should be monitored. Screening for progressive eye, liver, and kidney complications associated with Joubert-related disorders should be performed on a regular basis.

What is the prognosis?

The prognosis for infants with Joubert syndrome depends on whether or not the cerebellar vermis is partially developed or entirely absent. Some children have a mild form of the disorder, with minimal motor disability and good mental development, while others may have severe motor disability and moderate mental retardation.

What research is being done?

The NINDS supports research on the development of the nervous system and the cerebellum. This research is critical for increasing our understanding of Joubert syndrome, and for developing methods of treatment and prevention. NINDS, in conjunction with the NIH Office of Rare Disorders, sponsored a symposium on Joubert syndrome in 2002. Research priorities for the disorder were outlined at this meeting.

Organizations

Joubert Syndrome Foundation & Related Cerebellar Disorders

414 Hungerford Drive, Suite 252
Rockville, MD 20850
Phone: 614.864.1362

The Arc of the United States

1825 K Street, NW, Suite 1200
Washington, DC   20006
Phone: 202.534.3700
Toll-free: 800.433.5255
Fax: 202.534.3731

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)

55 Kenosia Avenue
Danbury, CT 06813-1968
Phone: 203.744.0100
Voice Mail: 800.999.NORD (6673)
Fax: 203.798.2291

Source: National Institutes of Health; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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This information is provided by the Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition. This document was last reviewed on: 9/29/2011…#6040

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