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Below, find some possible story ideas for media opportunities.
For more information about these items, or for other media requests, contact Cleveland Clinic's Corporate Communications at 216.444.0141.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our HealthHub content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.


May 2014

Find the Proper Bike Helmet Fit for Your Child

Helmets come in various sizes and taking the time to ensure a proper fit is important for your child’s safety. Because children grow fast, they may need a new helmet every year. Below are bike helmet fitting tips that Sigmund Norr, M.D., Vice Chair of Community Pediatrics at Cleveland Clinic Children’s recommends:

  1. All kids should wear a bike helmet no matter the age or skill level. It’s also important to encourage children to wear a helmet every time they ride.
  2. When buying a helmet, look for one that fits their head now and not one they will “grow into”.
  3. When wearing the helmet, cover the forehead and adjust straps until snug. Both the side and chin straps need to be snug.
  4. Check for any helmet shifting back and forth. If the helmet shifts more than an inch, shorten the straps and retighten the chin strap.
  5. Helmets should be replaced after every accident involving the head.
  6. Parents should model good behavior and wear helmets too. It shows kids that even adults need to wear helmets for protection and safety.

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org or 216.444.8853.

Summer Sports Injury Prevention

Summer is right around the corner and with the sunshine comes lots of activity and sports. Staying active is great for both parents and kids, but it’s important to practice safety while doing so. Here are some tips to help you stay healthy during your leap into springtime sports.

Paul Saluan, M.D., and Richard Figler, M.D, Sports Health Physicians at Cleveland Clinic offer the following tips:

  1. Growing Pains or Injury? Sometimes it is difficult to tell between the two. Seek a trained healthcare provider who will be able to tell the difference based on an examination or sometimes using x-rays.
  2. Take time to Stretch- If any part of an athlete’s body is overly tight, other parts of the body have increased motion to compensate. It would make sense to pursue a flexibility program in order to remain supple so that you can decrease her risk of injury. I would consider dynamic stretching as part of her routine, in order to decrease injuries to other parts of her body. Overall flexibility is a key to injury avoidance.
  3. Dynamic Stretching- This involves warming up the muscles and actually taking joints through a gentle range of motion while currently stretching the muscles through this arc of motion. This takes the place of what we used to do in the past, which was termed ‘static’ stretching. Performing dynamic stretching before and after events will lead to much better performance and hopefully to injury risk reduction.
  4. Strength and Conditioning- A good strength and conditioning program year-round is very helpful to maintain top athletic form. I would consider ‘periodizing’ ones activities. This means that he/she incorporates different activities to improve his/her overall strength and conditioning throughout the year.

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Laura Ambro at ambrol@ccf.org or 216.636.5876.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s Health Hub blog.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.

Tips for Men to Protect Their Urological Health

Slightly more than one in every four men (26 percent) have not seen a doctor or other health professional in the past 12 months, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This is a troubling tendency, said Eric Klein, M.D., chairman of Cleveland Clinic’s Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, considering many diseases and cancers that affect men are highly treatable—and even curable—if detected early.

About one in 250 men will develop testicular cancer in their lifetime, while one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.

“Men are sometimes reluctant to see a doctor for any number of reasons, ranging from embarrassment to simply not making the time for their personal health,” Dr. Klein said. “It’s important for men to pay attention to the signs their bodies are giving them.”

In recognition of Men’s Health Month in June, Dr. Klein offers the following tips for men to follow – and signs they should be aware of – to better “protect their package”.

Five Ways to Protect Your Package:
  1. Check yourself out. Men under the age of 35 are at a higher risk for testicular cancer. Do a monthly self-exam at home and make sure you get a yearly checkup from your physician. For those over 45, a baseline prostate exam is recommended, with subsequent follow-up exams determined by each individual’s symptoms and risk factors.
  2. Kick the habit. Smoking cigarettes contributes to the development of kidney and bladder cancers.
  3. Pay attention to your penis. Any new warts, blisters or spots could be a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or cancer.
  4. Communicate with your sexual partners. HPV, the main culprit for cervical cancer in women, can also cause penile cancer.
  5. Monitor your nighttime habits. Frequent trips to the bathroom at night could indicate an enlarged prostate.
Five Urological Symptoms Men Shouldn’t Ignore:
  1. Any type of pain “down there”. This could indicate testicular torsion, kidney stones or an infection.
  2. Blood in the urine. It could mean anything from a kidney stone, to cancer to an infection to kidney trouble.
  3. Erectile dysfunction. Not only is it a problem in the bedroom, but it can also be a symptom of blocked arteries and even type 2 diabetes.
  4. A lump inside the testicle. This could be a sign of testicular cancer.
  5. Warts, blisters or spots on the penis. It could be an STD or cancer.

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Tora Vinci at vinciv@ccf.org or 216.444.2412.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s Health Hub blog.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.