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January 2014

Below, find some possible story ideas for media opportunities.
For more information about these items, or for other media requests, contact Cleveland Clinic's Corporate Communications at 216.444.0141.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s HealthHub blog .

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our HealthHub content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org

January 2014

Tips for Women and Heart Health

Today, an estimated 43 million American women suffer from heart disease, making it the leading cause of death among women. Dr. Leslie Cho, Cleveland Clinic Cardiologist and Director of the Women’s Cardiovascular Center, offers five tips for reducing and monitoring women’s heart disease risk:

  • Have your fasting glucose levels checked
  • Know your family health history
  • Be a mindful eater and lead a healthy eating lifestyle
  • Have your cholesterol and blood pressure checked
  • Exercise every day

To learn more about this topic or to schedule an interview, please contact Tora Vinci at vinciv@ccf.org or 216.444.2412.

February Recognizes American Heart Month

Millions of Americans live with heart disease, stroke or a cardiovascular condition. As the leading cause of death in the United States, cardiovascular disease is not something that should be taken lightly. The month of February recognizes American Heart Month and aims to educate the public on preventing and treating heart-related illnesses and the importance of healthy lifestyle choices.

To learn more about this topic or to schedule an interview, please contact Tora Vinci at vinciv@ccf.org or 216.444.2412.

Toddler Sleeping Tips

If you are waging bedtime battles with your kids, you are not alone. According to the National Sleep Foundation, as many as 70 percent of children under age ten may experience a sleep problem. Dr. Kim Giuliano, pediatrician at Cleveland Clinic Children’s, tells her patients that consistency is key to a bedtime routine. If a bedtime is suddenly sprung on a child at different times, they are more likely to meet it with resistance.

Establishing good sleeping habits from infancy through childhood and adolescence is crucial. Dr. Giuliano suggests having some quiet wind-down activities, dimming the lights a little and putting away all electronics within an hour before bedtime can help prepare your child for sleep as well.

Learning your child’s internal body clock and looking for cues such as eye-rubbing or crankiness can also tell you they are ready to go to bed.

To learn more about this topic or to schedule an interview, please contact Maureen Nagg at naggm@ccf.org or 216.636.5879.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s Health Hub blog.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.

Thyroid Disorders: Symptoms to Watch for

Thyroid disorders affect more than 20 million Americans. People with thyroid disorders outnumber those with asthma and heart disease.

It can be difficult to diagnose thyroid disorders because many of the individual symptoms of thyroid disorders are extremely common. As a result, many people suffering from thyroid conditions remain undiagnosed because it is hard for a physician to pinpoint the problem unless the symptoms are viewed as part of a larger investigation.

However, there are signs to watch for that can indicate a thyroid disorder. For instance, disappearing eyebrows are one of the unique signs of hypothyroidism, the condition of having an underactive thyroid gland. Other symptoms include feeling worn out and depressed, unexplained weight gain, heavier periods, joint and muscle aches, constipation, dry skin and/or hair, or voice hoarseness.

Symptoms of hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) include excessive sweating, heat intolerance, frequent bowel movements, thinning of the hair, weight loss and irregular periods. These symptoms may accompany a goiter (enlargement of the thyroid gland).

To learn more about this topic or to schedule an interview, please contact Caroline Auger at augerc@ccf.org or 216.636.5874.

Blast versus Mechanical Concussions

Dr. Stephan Rao, Ph.D., Neurologist at Cleveland Clinic, studied the differences between blast and mechanical causes for concussion among 100 people. Someone does not necessarily have to be hit in the head to suffer a concussion. For example, standing near a large explosion can cause a traumatic brain injury (TBI) which often happens to soldiers in the military. The new study finds there are differences in the way the brain is injured by a blast versus a mechanical cause for concussion (such as a work or sports injury).

A key finding is that blast-related TBI has a unique effect on brain function that can be distinguished from TBI resulting from mechanical forces, and these changes last at least 4 years after the event. Different areas of the brain are affected and these results could now help doctors put together more specialized treatment based on how the person was injured.

To learn more about this topic or to schedule an interview, please contact Andrea Pacetti at pacetta@ccf.org or 216.444.8168.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s Health Hub blog.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org