Appointments

866.320.4573

Request an Appointment

Questions

800.223.2273

Contact us with Questions

Expand Content

February 2014

Below, find some possible story ideas for media opportunities.
For more information about these items, or for other media requests, contact Cleveland Clinic's Corporate Communications at 216.444.0141.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our HealthHub content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.


February 2014

Truth About Supplements and Heart Disease

There are many things that can be done to help take care of your heart but unfortunately taking supplements like fish oil or a multi-vitamin is not one of them. Cleveland Clinic heart specialists say that there is no evidence that fish oil supplements lower cholesterol.

A recent survey also found that almost half of Americans think vitamins can help lower cholesterol but they are actually less vital to heart disease prevention than most people think. Eating a healthy diet, exercising and knowing your risk factors are the best ways to prevent heart disease.

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Tora Vinci at vinciv@ccf.org or 216.444.2412.

Signs of Teen Dating Violence

Nearly one in every four high school relationships are said to involve abuse. A recent survey by the Centers for Disease Control found 1 in 10 teenagers reported being hit or hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend in the past year. Dr. Tatiana Falcone, child psychologist at Cleveland Clinic Children’s, says it’s important for parents to recognize early signs or pattern changes that may show their teenaged son or daughter has a violent boyfriend or girlfriend.

Some signs include:

  1. Your son or daughter has to text their boyfriend/girlfriend all the time to say where they are and what they are doing.
  2. They start to show signs of depressive or anxious behavior.
  3. They start to engage in unhealthy behaviors such as using tobacco, drugs and alcohol.

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Maureen Nagg at naggm@ccf.org or 216.636.5879.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s Health Hub blog.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.

Winter Sports Safety

The athletes in this winter’s Olympics take extreme measures to keep their bodies safe and in shape. If you’re motivated after watching these exceptional Olympians and want to take advantage of the fun outdoors, be sure to take proper precaution. Whether skiing, snowboarding, sledding, or ice skating there are simple steps to follow to prevent injury.

Richard Figler, M.D., Sports Health Physician at Cleveland Clinic offers the following tips:

  • Wear a helmet - 50% of sledding injuries that come through the emergency department are on the head. These are preventable simply by wearing a helmet. Helmets are comfortable, can keep your head warm and can reduce the risk of a concussion.
  • Take a lesson – If you’re hitting the slopes, do yourself a favor and take a lesson. Even if you have gone before, a lesson will help you refine your skills and give you an added benefit of confidence on the slopes.
  • Be aware of likely injuries - If you ski, be aware that the most likely injuries are to the knees and thumbs. Snowboarders should be extra mindful of wrist and ankle injuries. Keep these areas extra safe with good padding and equipment.
  • Layer up on everything but socks – Wear layers that you can easily remove if you get hot. Clothes should be windproof and waterproof so the breeze and dampness won’t end a fun winter activity. Jeans and sweatpants are a no and don’t layer multiple pairs of socks. This makes your feet sweat and damp, resulting in cold feet. Also, make sure your boots fit tight.
  • Use Common Sense - Be sure you eat before hitting the hills and get enough sleep. If you are tired, take a break. Pushing it to the limits and fitting in one more run could end up being the last run of the season.

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Laura Ambro at ambrol@ccf.org or 216.636.5876.

Outdoor Winter Workout Tips

The Winter Olympics are underway and motivating people to stay committed to their New Year’s resolution to hit the gym. However, indoor workouts can grow stale. For a fresh take on staying active, follow the lead of our Olympian athletes and take your workout outdoors.

Lutul Farrow, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon at Cleveland Clinic suggests the following tips for staying healthy and safe during winter workouts:

  1. Equipment - Be sure to have the proper equipment, including your outfit. This means layers, layers, layers. Avoid cotton and reach for other synthetic materials that will wick away moisture.
  2. Calorie Burn – Running outdoors can burn more calories than running indoors because it takes more effort. If you run through the snow it’s harder to keep a stable base which works your muscles more. This can be more beneficial for you and your weight loss goals.
  3. Temperature – First and foremost be smart and aware of your climate. The overall environment and wind chill can greatly affect the safety of your workout. Make sure your body can adapt to the winter temperatures.
  4. Injury – The most common accidents with winter workouts are slips and falls which can also cause injuries to the head and upper extremities. Athletes should be extra careful with their footwear and footwork.

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Laura Ambro at ambrol@ccf.org or 216.636.5876.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s Health Hub blog.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.