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April, 2014

Below, find some possible story ideas for media opportunities.
For more information about these items, or for other media requests, contact Cleveland Clinic's Corporate Communications at 216.444.0141.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our HealthHub content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.


April 2014

Baseball Injury Prevention Tips for Kids and Teens

Playing baseball is sure to be a popular activity this summer and although America’s favorite past time can be fun it’s important to treat the arms, elbows, and shoulders with care. Throwing and overuse injuries are on the rise and often occur when the arm performs “too much” or returns “too soon” after throwing. Paul Saluan, M.D., Sports Health Physician at Cleveland Clinic offers the following tips:

  1. Recognize the Injury - When a child is hurt, it’s important to pull him or her out of game play and practice right away. Don’t let injuries, especially those from repeated motion like throwing, become worse with continued play.
  2. Identify the Source of Pain – Figuring out what is causing the pain is important to keep from re-injury. If the pain is severe or not resolving within several days, be sure to take the child to see a doctor or medical professional.
  3. Don’t Make the Same Mistakes - After a child recovers, be sure you spend time retraining how to throw so the injury doesn’t recur. This might also mean decreasing the amount of throwing a child does as well as working on how he or she throws.
  4. Make an Appointment with the Throw Right Clinic – Cleveland Clinic medical professionals are highly experienced in dealing with such injuries at all levels. No two injuries are the same and injuries are addressed individually.
    • Program Services Include: Video analysis of mechanics and throwing motion as related to injury, complete baseball conditioning programs, baseball-specific physical evaluations, rehabilitation program for injuries that occur, and easy access to physician and physical therapy specialists, when needed.

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Laura Ambro at ambrol@ccf.org or 216.636.5876.

Look Out For Hidden Salt in Foods

Studies show that cutting down on sodium in your diet can lower blood pressure which reduces your risk of stroke, heart failure and other health problems. Experts say most people should consume less than 2,300 mg of sodium each day. That’s one teaspoon. People with certain medical conditions should consume even less.

However, the average American consumes about 3,400 mg of sodium per day – or 48 percent more than the recommended daily limit.

The Centers for Disease Control has a list of six popular foods with high sodium content dubbed the “Salty Six” that people show be aware of:

  1. Breads and rolls – each piece can have up to 230 mg of sodium
  2. Pizza – one slice can have up to 760 mg of sodium
  3. Cold cuts and cured meats – Two slices of bologna have 578 mg of sodium
  4. Poultry – especially chicken nuggets. Just 3 ounces have nearly 600 mg of sodium
  5. Canned soups – one cup of canned chicken noodle soup can have up to 940 mg of sodium
  6. Sandwiches – consider the bread, cured meats, processed cheese and condiments, and sandwiches can easily surpass 1,500 mg of sodium

To learn more about this topic or to coordinate an interview, please contact Tora Vinci at vinciv@ccf.org or 216.444.2412.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s Health Hub blog.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.

Spring Cleaning for Your Health

Spring is here and it’s time to take steps toward making your home a healthier place. Robert S. Juhasz, DO, president of Cleveland Clinic’s South Pointe Hospital and president-elect of the American Osteopathic Association says nothing is more important than the health of you and your family. Dr. Juhasz says there are steps to take to prevent illnesses and injuries before they occur and it starts by understanding how the environment around you, including your home, may affect your health.

  1. Schedule a visit with your physician for an annual wellness check. This includes getting the proper preventive health screenings.
  2. Tackle household chores for a cleaner, safer and healthier place to live. This includes cleaning out the medicine cabinet and disposing of expired medications, replacing filters in your furnace, dusting ceiling fan blades and vacuuming mattresses to remove dust and dander.
  3. Stock up on supplies to maintain a safe and healthy environment. This includes restocking first aid supplies, buying new filters for your furnace and trying environmentally-safe cleaning products to minimize asthma or allergy symptoms.

To learn more about this topic or to schedule an interview, please contact Angela Smith at smitha19@ccf.org or 216.445.0265.

Education is Key to Addressing Minority Men's Health

National Minority Men’s Health Month is April and aims to effectively address health disparities and encourage health screenings. Charles Modlin, MD, Urologist and Director of Minority Men’s Health Center at Cleveland Clinic says early detection is important as well as knowing your family health history. Among the most common health disparities are prostate cancer, hypertension, diabetes and kidney disease.

  • Prostate Cancer is the most common cancer among men.
  • African Americans have the highest rates of cancer in the world.
  • Prostate Cancer is 66% higher in African Americans than white males.
  • African Americans are six times more likely to develop kidney failure from hypertension and account for 32% of all treated patients.
  • Transplant success rates increase when organs are matched between members of the same ethnic and racial group. Therefore, a lack of organs donated by minorities can contribute to death and longer waiting periods for organ matches.

To learn more about this topic or to schedule an interview, please contact Tora Vinci at vinciv@ccf.org or 216.444.2412.

See what’s trending on Cleveland Clinic’s Health Hub blog.

If you are a member of the media and would like to link to our content or have interest in interviewing one of our physicians on the featured topics, please email Jenny Popis at popisj@ccf.org.